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Liquid fertilizer for corn

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Farmallb
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 8:27 pm    Post subject: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

ive seen planters for sale with (liquid fertilizer tanks. What is a good liquid fert to apply to corn,after all or any cultivation, after the corn is say 2ft tall. Is granualer fertilizer at planting time recommended? OR BOTH> I only have an OLD 2 row planter with fertilizer boxes. I have a sprayer to put on insectercide and/or fertilizer. I know what to use if I use granular fertilizer. Never used liquid fertilizer before. Cant get anhydrous here in Okla

 
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IaGary
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 3:02 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Farmallb Putting on fertilizer when corn is 2' tall is what we call sidedressing.

I do it every year and the best side dress fertilizer is nitrogen.

Reason being is that N doesn't stay put very long in the soil. So if you apply it later it will be there for the plant to use when it needs it most.

If you can get N in liquid form,I recommend that you knife into the ground between the rows.I would not spray it over the corn as it will burn the green plants.

If you use liquid fertilizer you should put on the same analysis of liquid as you would dry.

Example if you use a 120-90-90 in dry you should also use a 120-90-90 in liquid.

Gary

 

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paul
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 9:43 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Good advise Gary, but you might want to take all the zeros out of your message? Never saw fert add up to 370%. Smile

P & K can be applied the fall before planting, and mostly should be in the soil at least by planting time. Corn can use ~50 lbs of each per acre, will depend on your soils and how much yield you are going for, and field or sweet corn. Both don't move around very much in the soil (unless you get vastly too much P on the soil) so you can build up or store these 2 from one year to the next.

N there should be a little available during sprouting, and a lot available during the hot summer days & kenal set & fill. Good field corn will want 1 lb of N for each bu of corn produced. You might have almost none in the soil, or 50 lbs left from previous soybeans, or close to 100 from alfalfa/clover plow down, to 'whatever' from manure application. N can disappear on you in warm weather or soaking wet weather. So it's good to put a little down with the planter near the seed (not too much or it kills the seedlings!), and more down deeper or farther from the rows either before or after planting.

I'm not sure I understood the question as to liquid tho? Some liquid ferts are high in salt & deadly to aply onto the seed trench, others are low salt & can be applied up to 5 or so gal per acre directly on the seed. Some types need to be incorporated, others are better at soaking into the soil on their own, or with rain following. Some places are better at getting te 3 types of liquid to blend together in one solution than other places.

Foliar application of small doses of fertilizer are good at curing a short-term deficiency, and work real well with micro-nutrients if you are short of one of those from a tissue test (boron, zinc, sulfur, etc.). On typical farm crops, these foliar applications cost way more than they give you, as the plant can't absorb enough through the leaf of N,P,K to give you a real yield boost. They can only make the crop look a lot better for a week......

Going to depend on what type of liquid fert you use.

So, I don't think I answered the question, but maybe I helped the fellow with what it is he is asking? Smile

--->Paul

 

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IaGary
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 4:36 pm    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Paul those numbers would be actual lbs of N-P-K
applied per acre. So I apply 120 lbs of N,90 lbs of P and 90 lbs of K per acre.

To get those units I would have to apply 320 lbs of 28% liguid nitrogen. 200 lbs of 18-46-0 in dry form and 150 lbs of 0-0-60 if in dry form.

Which is about what I apply to my corn acres every year. It varies slightly from field to field depending on what the soil samples call for.

I buy my fertilizer in bulk form deliever in spreader carts by the ton. Liquid is put on 12" tall corn in early june with a coulter to get it into the ground to prevent leaching by the sun.

You can raise a good crop for a few years without applying that much but you are depleting the soil. Here we call that mining the soil by not returning anything to produce a crop 5 or 10 years down the road.

When you see a bag of say 10-10-10 it takes a 100 lbs of that mix to get 10 lbs of N, 10 lbs of P, and 10 lbs of K.

So bagged fertilizer is a expensive way to get many actual lbs of fertilizer.And very bulky also.

Foliar feeding is worse yet when it comes to expense.

Gary

 

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Farmallb
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 5:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I buy my fert (granular) by the ton bulk in the back of my pk. I then take the tractor ansd planter down to the field and set it up. Then I take the pk and back it to the planter and fill the Fert Boxes, I then pull the pk forward say 30ft m, come back and head out. put a ton on 8 acres. Cant use a knife, as #1 they dont have them here, and #2 My 34 CC Caase is only around 37hp with narrow rears in sandy soil, so thats why I was hopeing top spray something over the tops of the plant, IE side dressing.

 
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kyhayman
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 6:13 pm    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I always put mine on broadcast/dry before planting. Usually called for 120# actual N and 120# actual K per acre. N source if its conventional tillage is urea, if its sod ammonium nitrate. K source is muriate of potash. One of my neighbors started using a liquid 28% N solution this year. Seemed to work out ok. Local dealer sprays it on as a topdressing, right over the top. It burned the lead margins a bit but didnt hurt the corn or the yields.

 
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paul
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 9:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

'Round here they never expess it that way, I understand what you were saying now.

I haven't used liquid yet. NH3 is still king aroud here, way cheaper. Granular P&K, my soils are prettygood shape so basicly add what gets removed. My planter has granular, 2x2.

Liquid is starting to show up, the big fellas find it easier to run a pump than an auger.

--->Paul

 

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IaGary
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2007 3:29 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Morning paul.

How do you express the analysis that you apply per acre where you are?

Around here we tell our fert. salesman we want to put on a 25-80-100 in dry form and he mixes it accordingly. And the dry goes on in the fall or early spring as you said.

Then I would put on what ever nitrogen I want at
sidedress time to make a 120-80-100 applied for the crop year.

I quit using NH3 about 15 years ago when I had a close call with a broken hose. Stuff is just to dangerous in my mind to use. Life is to short.
But a lot of guys still use it here and it is your cheapest form of Nitrogen per unit or lb most times.

There are test that were done that showed it took less units per acre of liquid than NH3 to achieve the same yields.

That is why most change to liquid P and K around here also is for ease of handling.

Gary

 

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dad's88
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 12:20 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I didn't have any problem following what IaGary was saying, thought it was rather striaght foward myself.

 
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paul
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 7:38 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

We would give the % formulation we want, like 10-10-10 and we want however many tons of that. Or if they spread it, how ever many lbs of that per acre.

If I asked for 25-80-100 they would laugh & ask me how to get 205% of the fertilizer value in 100% of the bulk fert?

They use the actual % numbers around here. The 3 numbers can't add up to more that 100%.

Perhaps because most use NH3, and the granular is most often starter applied with the planter.

No big deal, I just didn't comprehend the numbers adding up to more than 100. Same ends, different terms. Smile

With folks around here fertilizing for 200bu yields, couple 1000 acres, fert price is king, NH3 is still popular with the hazards.

--->Paul

 

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paul
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 7:54 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I would sooner put the fert - any type - on before or during planting. If you don't put any at all on until the corn is 1-2 feet tall, that corn has missed out on a lot to get it off to a good start. Corn comes out of the ground to the 4-5 leaf stage, and gathers a lot of nutrients before hitting it's growth stage. I'd want it to have a little N and all of it's P & K available for that gathering period.

It is common to sidedress more N when the corn is a foot high or so. It is also common to put it on the fall before here in cold climates, and most common to put it all on right before planting.

For liquid sidedressing, you probably would want drop tubes to deliver the fert to the ground between rows. (Called dribbling around here.) Anything with much N in it will typically burn the green crop pretty badly on contact, not good to broadcast spray over the tops of the plants.

Some of the liquid formulations work well applied on top of the ground & soak in. Others should be knifed into the soil at least with a coulter, or they will evaporate into the air. Or you could apply right ahead of the cultivator to mix it in. Liquid is rare enough 'here' I best not get any more detailed than that, I will get it wrong if I try to say which is which.

For 8 acres without a soil test, any which way will probably work pretty good for you, but I would not spray over the _top_ of a 2 foot high crop without knowing for sure what's in the tank won't burn the crop badly.....

For what it's worth, I think what you are doing now is the best way to fertilize the corn.

--->Paul

 

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Bill(Wis)
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:08 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

They have pellitized urea now. It releases nitrogen into the soil all summer long. Works great. As far as what to put on, soil test will reveal what you need. Main advantage of liquid is in precise placement, particularly of phosphorous. P doesn't move around in the soil like N & K.

 
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dad's88
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 11:20 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Apparently we speak a different language when it comes to fertilizer rate, huh? Around here we also express rate as total pounds per acre. Has always been done this way, tells you everything you need to know. Just need to put a recipe together to come up with whatever a person is needing for final analysis. Don't have to worry about being laughed at either! Oh well, you say Crescent wrench and I say adjustable wrench. Maybe it's an Iowa thing? BTW, 200 Bu corn yields are kind of a yawner around here anymore, everyone seems to get them. Must be that "POOR" Iowa soil. My personal best has been 318 bu/ac. Working on trying to average that now, but it does have to rain. Take care.

 
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James22
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 1:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Liquid is easier to handle during planting, but more costly. You generally have to deal with squeeze pumps and other metering crap with liquid. Pondering a planter update and although it is easier to find liquid rather than dry, I decided to stay with dry. I do have a pump for the liquid and also a tank, which I now use for water, but also have the auger and gravity wagon setup for dry. If you have a drought, the liquid will be more available for plant uptake I know someone who bought a new White planter with liquid, having used dry before. Had a lot of little nagging problems. Finally a connection came loose while he was planting, and more than 500 gallons poured out on the ground. Never used it after that.

Have side dressed by spin spreading (3-pt spreader) over the top, dry ammonium nitrate with great results. Ammonium nitrate is an expensive nitrogen source and is difficult to get. Not advisable to spread urea over the top it may burn the plant. Have also sidedressed 28% by dribbling in the middle of the row with sprayer drops. Worked Ok but more operator crop damage, hired it done vs spread myself. Have strongly considered buying 3-pt rig with intergal tank and lift assist wheels to side knife in 28% in a side dress operation. Missed the opportunity to purchase a fine looking 12 row unit for $7500 a few years ago. I thought it was too expensive, but probably twice that amount now.

 

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FarmerboyB
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 11:53 am    Post subject: Re: Liquid fertilizer for corn Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I have seen several replys where someone thinks I am spraying OVER the corn. What I thought to do was use those drop sprayers that hang from the boom a foot or so, and have the boom just high enough to brush the tops of the leaves. Would you think that would still burn the corn, and what about running the actual nozzles lengthways rather than wide ways with the row to reduce spray width if in the case stated above they might still hurt the stalk with the sporay? Thanks for the great replys, and timely answers. Bill

 
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