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changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A


 
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Joe Appelget
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2007 10:06 am    Post subject: changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Hello Everyone-

I am hauling a 1946 JD A from FL to MI in a couple weeks. it is currently 93 inches wide in the rear. I MUST achieve less than 91.5 inches to get it in the enclosed trailer. I was told bu the local JD dealer that I can achieve 88 inches by moving the wheels in. I know they will move in farther than that but then the axles will stick out which won't help me any. Is this information correct? how do you change the wheel spacing on an A? I haven't ever done it and don't know how, please give me any advise you might have.

Thanks

Joe

 

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dds-inc
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2007 11:59 am    Post subject: Re: changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A Reply to specific post Reply with quote

axles stick out about 88 inches, IF they're only the short axles.

Moving in wheels involves jacking up one side at a time, removing three bolts, spraying tons and tons of PB blaster on the axle, and getting the hub to slide on the axle. (perhaps more than likely using a BFH)

If the tractor has been outside for an extended period of time, moving in those wheels will be the hardest job you've ever done.

HOWEVER, you may be able to move in JUST ONE wheel and it might fit in the trailer.

 

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Mike M
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2007 6:30 pm    Post subject: Re: changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Is there anyone where the tractor is now that you can pay to do it ? Or at least start dumping on the penetrant oil.

I like to run a tap into the threaded holes in the collar so when you remove the hold down bolts and you screw them in for jack screws they move freely and apply more force to get the clamps off. If it has cast iron centers you can loop a chain through the wheel weight bolt holes and then around the axle housing and get it even and then jack up that side and rotate that wheel thus winding up the chain and drawing in the wheel.

 

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sds46a
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2007 8:56 pm    Post subject: Re: changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If you have the pressed steel wheels and the the offset is dished out, maybe you can just remove the 9 bolts from the hub and then reverse the wheel?

Doug

 

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Andy Kimmet
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:48 am    Post subject: Re: changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A Reply to specific post Reply with quote

It is not an easy job. My B took about four hours to move both wheels in. I was lucky though because the tractor had been inside most of its life. Used a lot of PB and a 3/4 impact.


 
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James Howell
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2007 10:54 am    Post subject: Re: changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Back in 1994, I “switched” the wheels on my favorite wife’s 48A so that the inward-curving (concave) surface was facing out away from the tractor.

First thing to do is not get in a hurry. Moving wheels in and out or “reversing” wheels might take some time.

Before I work on a wheel/hub/tire project for the very first time on a tractor, PB Blaster is sprayed on the axle, hub, collar, and bolts every week at least 3-4 weeks before attempting to “move” the wheel.

If you are not using the tractor, jack up the axle, rotate/turn the wheel, and spray with PB Blaster. Take a small sledge hammer and “tap” on the hub, collar, and bolts. Repeat this process several times.

The key word when using the small sledge hammer is “tap”. One of the previous owners of my 43B splintered the cast center wheel. My favorite wife spotted the cracks when we picked up the tractor. When I carefully removed the wheel, it fell apart in 3 pieces. I was fortunate enough to find another cast center wheel for only $125.

I always use a rotary grinder with a wire wheel to “brush” the axle splines on both sides of the hub. Use a grinder to remove any “mushrooms” on the end of your axle splines created by previous owners with big sledge hammers.

A log chain is threaded through the holes in the wheel. I use an old mechanical jack to “pull” the hub/wheel by applying pressure on the axle. Rotate/turn the wheel and spray with PB Blaster. Take a small sledge hammer and “tap” on the hub. Apply more pressure with your jack. Repeat this process until you can “wiggle” your wheel off by hand.

After removing the hub/wheel, you should finish brushing the axle splines. Use a small wire toothbrush to clean inside your hub.

With the axle splines and inside hub clean and shiny, you should be able to “wiggle” the wheel back on the axle. If the wheel cannot be moved by hand, I use a big sledge hammer with a 12” handle and an oak block.

Oak blocks are less expensive to replace than cracked hubs or cracked wheels. Believe me when I say the recoil off an oak block is far less than the recoil of a cast wheel.

Put the oak block against the hub and “hit” the oak block. Rotate the wheel and hit the oak block. Repeat this process until you position the wheel to your satisfaction.

The process described above works fine for me because it causes me no bodily harm, frightens none of the farm animals, requires no help from my favorite wife, and keeps the neighbors from hearing my lack of vocabulary.

Hope this helps. Good luck!


 
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Jon Hurley
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:50 am    Post subject: Re: changing wheel spacing on a John Deere A Reply to specific post Reply with quote

make sure the tires aren't loaded with calcium first. they will be alot heavier if they are. a buddy of mine was taking his front tires of an Allis D21 and found out the hard way. have your valve stem towards the bottom and push in, if any liquid comes out, they are loaded. make sure to clean any off with lots of water because it will rust your wheels.

 
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