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It was above 50F, but. . .

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PJH
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:12 am    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

ptfarmer, that's an interesting idea.

Thanks for the advice - I'm trying to soak it all up.
 
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Stephen Newell
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:44 pm    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

It sounds like you may have had too much pressure in the pot. I don't know exactly how that sprayer is rigged but you should be able to adjusted it to where it pours out paint like a garden hose or puts out the volume like a cup gun. With the large tank I have I think it's less than 1 psi difference between it not spraying and gushing out.
 
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PJH
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 5:38 pm    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This gun is touchy - it had a low pressure threshold around 35 psi where it would get intermittent and spitty. I found a sweet spot closer to 40 where it was consistent and it never gave any problem. It put out more paint that I was used to, but I learned to move faster and got along with it ok.
 
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ptfarmer
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:04 pm    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

YTSupport wrote:
(quoted from post at 08:57:23 11/08/17) I sympathize. This happened to me last week. Weather was perfect, unseasonably warm, tee shirt weather so I shot everything I could. By the third coat, my gun clogged up and messed up a few pieces (I had been having trouble since I shot some 1K sealer that was a bear to clean out and kept proving that anytime I'd paint for a bit). I let most everything else dry enough to move and had interruptions until it was late in the day before I got back to fix the issues with the parts that had been messed up. I knew it was too late in the day, but I was determined to push through, and reshot them anyway. Before I could pick them up to put them back in the shop, the weather turned dramatically. When I came back up in the morning to see how they fared, those parts shot in the evening all were blushed.

I decided to experiment, treat it as a "what if I had to use the parts as is", since everything will now need to be scuffed and recoated so I can shoot clear. I had to order a new gun because I'm fed up with this one and between that and weather, I've missed the window to clear coat anyway. After a not-too-reasonable dry time (a few days), I took the blushed wheel guard and in a test spot, sanded with 400, 1000 then 1500 grit, then rubbing compound, then guitar polish (about the same thing I do with guitars to get a mirror finish and it's all I had, a warning here is if you test like that, polishes contain stuff that demand you use naptha or acetone and then sand if you plan to repaint over the spot as I do). It frankly doesn't look bad at all and if I did have to live with it, it would be okay. The exercise caused me to realize that I wasn't getting good leveling, but that is another story.

While I doubt the blushing hurts the integrity of the job, the problem is that if you had to do everything that way, it would use a lot of time and consumables and is a lot of work. Worse, on a tractor, the nooks and crannies would never shine as well as the open surfaces, you just can't get at them with the elbow grease necessary. Of course I'll be sanding all that back before recoating with base so I can clear coat.

My honest opinion that you only will get "good enough" by buffing and polishing a blushed part. I don't have the time to prove that, but if it is possible, the time would be more than scuffing and shooting again. I invested probably 10 to 15 minutes into a 6x3 inch area and still didn't feel it had the luster I'd really want out of a new paint job. In that time, I could have scuffed the entire wheel guard and shot it again.

The photo shows the wheel guard on the left that wasn't painted in the evening, and the one on the right that was. You can see the right hand one is flat orange from humidity damage.




Did you use gloss hardener when you painted it?
 
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PJH
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:32 pm    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I didn't use a hardener - I don't have the proper breathing equipment.
 
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ptfarmer
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:04 pm    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CVPost-PJH wrote:
(quoted from post at 23:32:20 11/09/17) I didn't use a hardener - I don't have the proper breathing equipment.




A good breathing mask is good to have even when you don't use a hardener. When you don't use a hardener do not try to sand, or buff the paint out. On enamel without the hardener only the "outer skin" of the paint fully dries, and the chemicals in the paint underneath never fully dries. Once you break through that dry outer surface the paint will never stay shiny. I ruined my first enamel paint job many, many years ago doing that but thinking I could sand, and buff the paint to make shine even more.
 
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PJH
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 9:10 am    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

"Pressure in the pot"

I re-read your post - I was fooling with the main regulator, trying to get a sweet spot. I probably should have paid a little more attention to the regulator on the pot itself. Thanks for the tip - the directions that came with it are pretty vague.
 
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Dave Beiter
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:53 am    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

So you just shoot straight thinner through the spray gun to give it a light coat?? Interesting.. I may give that a try on my next painting project
 
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Stephen Newell
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 11:31 am    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

About the only paint that would work on is lacquer. On enamel paint thinner would just lay on the surface once it has flashed off. You would only have a very few seconds to dissolve in enamel overspray.
 
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ptfarmer
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:27 pm    Post subject: Re: It was above 50F, but. . . Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CVPost-Stephen Newell wrote:
(quoted from post at 12:31:21 11/15/17) About the only paint that would work on is lacquer. On enamel paint thinner would just lay on the surface once it has flashed off. You would only have a very few seconds to dissolve in enamel overspray.



No, the thinner will "open up" the paint until it flashes off, before the thinner flashes which is very few seconds it allows any overspray to soak into the paint which will bring the shine back after the thinner flashes. It will work on lacquer also, but if you want a really, nice, shiny paint job with lacquer you have to sand, and buff the paint afterwards. Lacquer paint is not as durable as enamel, plus as I said before a lacquer paint job needs to be sanded, and buffed to get good shine from it. Since lacquer is thin you need to apply a lot more coats, when lacquer was the paint for custom paint jobs you put on about 20 coats because of what you loose from the sanding, and buffing afterwards. Enamel you don't have to sand, and buff to get a good shine so you only need about 3 coats.
 
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