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Speeds with a trailer

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D beatty
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Joined: 23 Jan 2013
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 2:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Well your alright till you get caught or have an accident . That's when the lawyers come down on you like a hammer.
 
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DoubleO7
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Joined: 27 Oct 2017
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Location: Crystal River, FL

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 6:45 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CVPost-D beatty wrote:
(quoted from post at 12:27:01 01/28/1Cool He's talking 14,000lb. Trailer. The bearings on a 14,000lb trailer would as good if not better than bearing in the front end of a 1/2 ton
pickup. One axle on a trailer is rated at 7,000lbs. and the total weight of most 1/2 tons is less than 5,500 lbs. so your not carrying much
over maybe 3,000lbs on front axle of truck at the most.


Sounds like a good argument for the trailer bearings.
Except for the fact that most pickups now-a-days can go over 100,000 miles with the OEM wheel bearings.

How many miles do you get on the average 14k trailer wheel bearing?
Even when religously maintained the trailer bearings will not last as long.
 
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jon f mn
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Location: Pine City Mn

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 7:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

They certainly will. I had several
contractors run them that long. One
contractor bought a skid loader trailer
from me. When he picked it up it was with a
new pickup. Several years later he traded
that truck off and the trailer had never
been unhooked except to service the truck.
The truck had 170k on it. The trailer had
the brakes and suspension rebuilt several
times, but the only new bearings were when
the hubs were replaced because they were
worn out of spec for brakes.
 
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Eldon (WA)
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Location: washington

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 7:55 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

DoubleO7 wrote:
(quoted from post at 19:45:24 01/28/1Cool
CVPost-D beatty wrote:
(quoted from post at 12:27:01 01/28/1Cool He's talking 14,000lb. Trailer. The bearings on a 14,000lb trailer would as good if not better than bearing in the front end of a 1/2 ton
pickup. One axle on a trailer is rated at 7,000lbs. and the total weight of most 1/2 tons is less than 5,500 lbs. so your not carrying much
over maybe 3,000lbs on front axle of truck at the most.


Sounds like a good argument for the trailer bearings.
Except for the fact that most pickups now-a-days can go over 100,000 miles with the OEM wheel bearings.

How many miles do you get on the average 14k trailer wheel bearing?
Even when religously maintained the trailer bearings will not last as long.


This hotshot guy claims he runs about 100k per year on a trailer. Bearings get greased and adjusted every 4 months, brakes, springs and hardware replaced once a year. I buy a new trailer every 5 years after they are depreciated out, seems to work for me as it costs me about $300 a year to own a nice trailer. Never have replaced a bearing and rarely buy a tire. I average around 10k miles per year, most of it local hauling.
 
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Destroked 450
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Joined: 31 Mar 2016
Posts: 2644
Location: Harned, Ky.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 9:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote


I don't put a lot of miles on my trailers, couple thousand on the small 96 model and around 7 thousand on the 06 20K lb tandem dually.
I've replaced one bearing on the small trailer and none on the big trailer, they have been repacked a number of times.
I only run LT type tires on my trailers, to many of the ST brands are China bombs, blow out long before they wear out.

Here in Ky interstate speeds are 70 mph for cars and trucks, doesn't matter if their pulling a trailer or not.

Pulled semi trailers with both greased and oil filled hubs for 30 years, I've seen more bearing failures from oil filled where a leaking seal or hub cap had leaked all of the oil out.
 
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ASEguy
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 4:51 am    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

My Dexter axle on my PJ trailer is that way.
 
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Moonlite37
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I would be more concerned about the tires than I would be about the wheel bearings
 
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DoubleO7
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Location: Crystal River, FL

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:08 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

DoubleO7 wrote:
(quoted from post at 22:45:24 01/28/1Cool
CVPost-D beatty wrote:
(quoted from post at 12:27:01 01/28/1Cool He's talking 14,000lb. Trailer. The bearings on a 14,000lb trailer would as good if not better than bearing in the front end of a 1/2 ton
pickup. One axle on a trailer is rated at 7,000lbs. and the total weight of most 1/2 tons is less than 5,500 lbs. so your not carrying much
over maybe 3,000lbs on front axle of truck at the most.


Sounds like a good argument for the trailer bearings.
Except for the fact that most pickups now-a-days can go over 100,000 miles with the OEM wheel bearings.

How many miles do you get on the average 14k trailer wheel bearing?
Even when religously maintained the trailer bearings will not last as long.

It appears I was not clear with the intended meaning of my previous post..............................

How can anyone claim trailer wheel bearings, that have to be greased and adjusted several times a year are comparable quality to automotive wheel bearings?
A modern truck often never needs repacking or adjustment of the wheel bearings.
For the same amount of mileage.
 
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D beatty
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Joined: 23 Jan 2013
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 7:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Your missing one big point . The front bearings on the front of a pickup truck don't carry any where the weight of a trailer and take more
abuse. I have several friends that own their own repair shops and a lot of truck front wheel bearings never reach 100,000 miles.
 
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VicS
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Maybe different brands are better or worse
but no. 1234567 bearing can be used in
thousands of application's. I think people
who fill their hub plum full of grease and
don't tighten bearings enough have most of
the trouble. Also I was taught to always
use Molly grease same as was in the grease
gun.
 
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showcrop
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Joined: 13 Dec 2000
Posts: 20360
Location: Chester NH

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 4:44 am    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CVPost-VicS wrote:
(quoted from post at 22:03:42 01/31/1Cool Maybe different brands are better or worse
but no. 1234567 bearing can be used in
thousands of application's. I think people
who fill their hub plum full of grease and
don't tighten bearings enough have most of
the trouble. Also I was taught to always
use Molly grease same as was in the grease
gun.


That right there can be the cause of a big problem in selecting the right grease. While a moly grease is a high heat grease there are chassis lube greases that are not designed for the high heat generated by wheel bearings. So if someone is "always taught" by 2-3 people that don't know, they will most likely continue to do that instead of looking in the owner's manual or product guide themselves. When I am repacking a bearing I grab my tub of wheel bearing grease, But when I am lubing a wheel bearing that has a grease fitting on the cap, of course I use the grease gun with the chassis grease in it. I use moly grease myself, but in a lot of shops I assume that they use other grease.
 
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mdross
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 6:05 am    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Another subject producing plenty of opinion. My 14k trailer is regularly maintained bearings greased, tire pressure checked etc. During and after most long heavy hauls always touch all the hubs to see how much heat has built up. By no means afraid to haul over 70mph with tractor strapped on back, again it's all up to the individual.
 
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caterpillar guy
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:08 am    Post subject: Re: Speeds with a trailer Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If the tires are large enough for the job they should not get hot. I do know running in the south during the summer they will run hotter than farther north. AZ,NM,TX versus NE,IA,WY. That said tires getting hot are one of a few things to small,overloaded,under inflated. The 3 biggest tire problems. As for bearings I will still stand by my oil filled bearings and Stemco Seals. Stemco has a wear sleeve and installed properly will outlast any other seal on the road currently. I've used them all in 20 years as an O/O .
 
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