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Baker brake question


 
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CaptonZap
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Joined: 10 May 2013
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 1:45 pm    Post subject: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Howdy,
I have a Baker Forklift Mod MF040, and the brakes require a quick pump before they will grab. Once pumped up, they do not bleed down, so I think all the cylinders are good.
However, I can't find any place to adjust the brakes. Can anybody tell me how that is accomplished?
Thanks for any advice.

CZ
p.s. Ser #45901
 


Last edited by CaptonZap on Fri May 10, 2013 1:46 pm; edited 1 time in total
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 3:38 pm    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote


They need to have air bled out.
 
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CaptonZap
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 4:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote


That was my first thought, so I got a vacuum bleeder and bled them till no bubbles came out. Once pumped up, the pedal is hard, which if it had air in it, it would be spongy. It isn't, it is solid.
The question is, how are the shoes adjusted to take up the clearance caused by lining wear?
Thanks for the thought, CZ
 
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 5:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CaptonZap wrote:
(quoted from post at 17:34:35 05/10/13)
That was my first thought, so I got a vacuum bleeder and bled them till no bubbles came out. Once pumped up, the pedal is hard, which if it had air in it, it would be spongy. It isn't, it is solid.
The question is, how are the shoes adjusted to take up the clearance caused by lining wear?
Thanks for the thought, CZ


I suppose I could be wrong but it was what I was taught long ago is that a pedal that is spongy and become firm when you pump it is classic air in system. Air is compressible. You compress it with a pump or two and it is firm enough to support your pressure on the pedal. Kind if like the difference between a soft tire and a fully inflated one.
 
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 5:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CaptonZap wrote:
(quoted from post at 17:34:35 05/10/13)
That was my first thought, so I got a vacuum bleeder and bled them till no bubbles came out. Once pumped up, the pedal is hard, which if it had air in it, it would be spongy. It isn't, it is solid.
The question is, how are the shoes adjusted to take up the clearance caused by lining wear?
Thanks for the thought, CZ


I suppose I could be wrong but it was what I was taught long ago is that a pedal that is spongy and become firm when you pump it is classic air in system. Air is compressible. You compress it with a pump or two and it is firm enough to support your pressure on the pedal. Kind if like the difference between a soft tire and a fully inflated one.
 
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Dalex
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 5:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If you can post pix of the backing plate I may be
able to help you. There are only a few methods of
adjustment....
 
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504-1
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 5:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I don t know how on your machine but the brakes need adjusting. It may be a bolt and jam nut eccentric, or maybe it has a knock out plug. You really need to pull a drum and make sure you have shoes left.
 
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Determined
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 6:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If yours is like the one I worked on years ago there are two I believe 3/4 inch bolt heads sticking out of the back of the backing plate which control adjusting cams behind the shoes.
They should be located at approx 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock.
One adjusts each shoe, to tighten the shoes put a wrench on each one so the wrench is straight up and down and move the top of the wrenches away from each other, you may need to use a ratchet or other to get at the adjuster nuts but what I described is just to indicate which way to turn the adjusters.
Wheels off the ground tighten until drag is felt, then back off a bit X 4.
Dave
 
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CaptonZap
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PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 5:57 am    Post subject: Re: Baker brake question Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Thanks Determined,

I was hoping that there was something that I overlooked. However, on this truck, there are only two bolt heads on the backing plate, and they hold the brake cylinder to the plate.
The gear reduction housing is about as large, diameter wise, as the backing plate, and extends out to within a quarter of an inch of the backing plate, with only a relief at the top for the brake line and bleed port. Thus, no room for adjustment bolts.
I've heard that some brakes require removal of the drum for adjustment, although I've never seen such an arrangement.
All thoughts and suggestions are appreciated.

CZ
 
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