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explain this to me.....

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47farmallM
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Joined: 04 Feb 2010
Posts: 156
Location: Decatur TX

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:50 pm    Post subject: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Now in Texas it is unusual to grow alfalfa.. but there's a few field by me that are alfalfa.. usually they come in cut it, rake and round bale it.... but today they came in and cut it, raked it then had some kind of krone baler that baled it and wrapped it.. all in the same day.... now isn't green hay combustible? wouldn't it get all moldy? sorry i just have never seen this in Texas.. would someone please explain this process to me.
 
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Roger in Iowa
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Location: Ottumwa, Iowa

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:53 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Making round bale silage.
 
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JMOR
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:12 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Roger that! Smile Been seeing it for years at east Texas dairys.
 
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47farmallM
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Location: Decatur TX

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:15 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

well that explains it.. all the alfalfa goes to a dairy in stephenville Texas... just never seen it done up here
 
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donjr
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:55 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

That's a fairly new machine from Krone. It's combining two machines into one- one to make the bale and another to wrap it, all in one operation.
 
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Roy in UK
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:06 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Well I hate to tell you guys across the pond but
we beat you all to it! Round bale silage was invented
by a Brit in the 1980s. The method of conserving
silage in round bales in silage was pioneered in
the 1980"s by a British farmer called Lloyd
Forster. The original method was to put them into
big plastic bags sealed with cable ties which was
a very slow and tedious job and the results were
"mixed" to say the least. Then whilst travelling
through Australia Mr. Forster was approached by a
firm that was making a machine to wrap bales in
plastic. However,the first successful machine for stretch wrapping
silage bales was built by Kverneland in
association with Mr. Forster and a British animal feed company
called Volac. We bought one almost as soon as they
appeared on the market because we were sick of
making poor quality hay due to a run of very wet
summers we were having at the time. If made
correctly, round bale silage is wonderful stuff.
Lloyd Forster
Edit. While I was researching this, I found that sadly Mr. Forster died last April.
 


Last edited by Roy in UK on Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:16 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Roy in UK
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:19 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Lloyd Forster's obituary
The Father of Round Bale Silage

 
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RalphWD45
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Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 1227
Location: Roy, Wa.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:44 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

We call it haylige here in western washington, and seems to be fairly common now.
 
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samn40
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 11:16 pm    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

And a firm called McHale here in Ireland developed the baler -
wrapper all in one combination. As Roy said we depend on it.....no
matter how wet the grass is it still makes good silage...last
'summer' we even had to bale in the rain!. Maybe you missed my
post last week where I showed pics of wrapping small square bales
of hay to make haylage for horses?
Sam

 
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John_PA
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Location: Burgettstown, PA

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 12:07 am    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Roy,

Almost all the good new farm techniques originate in the UK or Europe. I'm proud to say that what happened 15 or 20 years ago, is now adopted in the USA.

I am grateful for the farm innovation. I always look to the east for the next big thing. I'm glad that someone gets a new idea every generation. Look at the FWD tractor market. before the push pull plow in the early 80's, a FWD tractor was rare in the states. I'm glad to see that even though we don't do the up and over ploughing, we still have adopted the FWD tractor.


I hope that you know that I am on top of the trends that originated out your way. I just hope that the newest trends will make my life a lot easier.


Thanks for being on top of the newest trends.

John
 
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Bruce from Can.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 1:55 am    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Nothing new about wraping wet bales here in Canada either. Dairy faarmers have been wraping big round bales since tne early 1980's. Tha wraper in the picture is an older modle I have that I belive came out of Finland. The wife and I have wraped over 350 bales in the last week of June.Bales can be wraped as I do induvidually, or in a tube,or continueous line wraped in a long row. Bruce

 
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Traditional Farmer
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 3:18 am    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Farmers were bagging silage/haylage in the US before there were large round balers
 
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JRSutton
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Location: Sutton, MA

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 3:42 am    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I was in England once (Chipperfield) in the early 80's. I wondered what all those huge plastic bags were for in the fields - a taxi driver actually explained to me that it was a new expiremental process for round bales.

... I remember thinking you guys were crazy!
 
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Roy in UK
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 4:25 am    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Almost...
Another unsung hero that has saved farmers thousands
of man hours throughout the world was indeed an
American. John Appleby, The man who pioneered the
Twine Knotter.
John Appleby.

 
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donjr
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 4:36 am    Post subject: Re: explain this to me..... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Like sileage in a silo or pit, if you cut the air off to cellulose materials, and the process works right, spoilage bacteria will start to work and burn up the oxygen in the material. Then, an amazing thing starts to happen. Another bacteria, also present, starts to multiply and causes the material to start to break down and release sugars in the material and ferment. The spoilage bacteria dies in the newer acid envirionment without oxygen, and the fermentation process preserves the material in a new form as it literally cooks itself slowly at somewhere around 150 degrees or so. It seems that the cows like it, and will eat it like candy. Plus, it's high tonnage and quick to put up. Mine goes into a big bunk silo, and while I might lose a bit on the top where the air can still get to it, the little bit that does spoil gets mixed with the rest of it and the cows eat all of it. McHale just started doing it to hay in bags, which is rather labor intensive, but it sure saves a lot of hay which otherwise would have been tossed out into a fencerow or woods.
 
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