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To 'no till drill' or planter?


 
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Fuddy Duddy
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 7:59 pm    Post subject: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'll probably pass on these deals. Don't won't to drive that far and a little bigger than I want. I do like the planter. But which would be better? A 'No till drill" or the planter? Seems like they both do the same thing. Guess the 'no till' means less dirt work? Once I retire (Not to far away) I might want to plant 20 acres of corn or something to make a little money. Right now I plant a few row of corn in my little garden for myself. And last year I broad casted some seeds for the Deer. These are a little over 100 miles away. Should I jump on one? I'm thinking maybe a two or four row might suit me better. But will I maybe round up paying more for a smaller unit?
John Deere Grain Drill food plot

 
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Fuddy Duddy
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 8:01 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Here's the planter
John Deere 6 Row Sweet Corn or Food Plot Planter

 
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CT8N
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:05 am    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I have a drill similar to this. The price is reasonable, however this is not a no till drill. The ground must be prepared before planting. A no till usually uses hydraulic pressure to force the disks into the ground and costs much more than $700. My drill has a mechanical lift; you will have to get off the tractor raise and lower this one.
 
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POPGUN
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 12:13 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

That JD planter would be my pick. It looks like it is well cared for. You can hand broadcast anything it wont do. Or get them both and after ya use them sell the one ya dont need next spring. Money is made to spend thats all its good for. LOL
 
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john B. ne in
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 1:57 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

When we sewed wheat and oats, we started on the outside of the field and sewed in basically circles. That way we never raised the drill. Around here a drill like that would only bring scrap price. Even on those old drills if you look around more, possibly at auctions, you can find one with a hydraulic lift or a trip lift. On a hydraulic lift a one way cylinder will work. A N tractor would work well. On a mechanical lift a trip rope set up is all that's needed to lift it similar to a trip type plow. As for the six row planter, they don't bring much on resale. It's to big for the small guy and to small or old for the bigger guy. I'v seen seen planters like that sell for less than $100. That price varies on whether there's a scrapper buying iron. I wouldn't go more than half the asking price on either piece. There's just no market for those pieces. I'm guessing that would be around half the scrap price.
 
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notjustair
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 3:16 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Funny you should ask - a new (to me) no till drill AND planter were in the cards this year. Both Deere. The drill is a 750 and the planter is a 1750. The guy I bought the drill from used it for corn but he had to guess at everything as there aren't really settings for it. I don't know what his stand was like but I would say he was living on the edge if he did a lot. Depending on what you are doing you may get more out of a planter. The new one will be used for soybeans and milo. The drill was a good buy and will only be for the years when getting in to disk for the wheat is impossible. There are a couple of fields that will do well no till as well. The planter is by far the most handy of the two, at least for what I do. Soil contact for milo is pretty important so I went with a true no till rather than a beefed up regular 7000 planter.

The 1750 was local but the drill had to be pulled home - round trip this last Sunday was nine hours. Not so fun when the drill is only slightly more narrow than a few bridges I had to use. Like I say, it was a good deal so I pulled it. It wasn't painful - I'd do it again. I stopped a few times and greased wheel bearings and it made it just fine at 35 mph. That's only three hours or so for you.
 
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john B ne in
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 5:10 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I meant to say scrap price would be half of the reduced price, or around $150 a piece.
 
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Colin King
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:11 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

They both look decent and the prices are acceptable, based on what I see in my area. I might hold out for a slightly larger drill. The one you're looking at is pretty small.

As ct8n points out, the drill is just a drill. A no-till drill is a hydraulically operated drill that require lots and lots of ponies (usually 100hp+) and is well beyond the capacity of any of the pre-thousand series Fords.

The N can comfortably pull up to a 10ft drill and a 2 row corn planter. You should be able to disassemble that corn planter and make either a pull behind or a 3pt 2 row unit.

Colin, MN
 
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504
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 6:56 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I would buy the planter, if you want narrow rows, the cheap and easy way is to just double row beans. Plant a set of rows, then turn right back on the pass and plant between the rows.
 
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Fuddy Duddy
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 7:13 pm    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I do have a 861 to pull the planter. I guess that would pull a 6 row? I would had thought an N would pull more than a 2 row. I'm just trying to learn about them right now. I now see the difference in a Drill and a No Till. If I was to get one of these I wouldn't have the time to get ready to use it this year. Looks like there is going to be a pretty good farm auction just a few miles from me this weekend. I might wander over there. Here's another drill that about 70 miles from me and a little cheaper. Can't tell if it's the same size or not.
John Deere FB Seed Drill

 
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Colin King
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 5:55 am    Post subject: Re: To 'no till drill' or planter? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Looks to be an 8 foot drill. General rule of thumb is spacing is 6" apart. If you go look at it, make sure that the seed rate application adjusters move freely. Also check the drive chain. Check the springs. And check that all of the seed tubes are in good condition. Make sure that the boxes are not rusted through.

I just purchased a really nice 10 foot Van Brunt on rubber for $450. A heck of a deal. Shedded and well maintained. Bringing it home tomorrow. I'll post some photos.

Others would have more experience with corn planters than I would, but I think you need about 50-60hp to run a 6 row planter. The hundred series can run a 4 row planter. An 861 might do 6 rows if your soil is light and you're really working her, but I wouldn't count on it.

Colin, MN
 
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