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Concrete

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jr1983
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:23 am    Post subject: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'm debating on getting a garage this spring. It is used I would be moving it in. What I'm thinking of is 20 x 25. The heaviest thing I'll probably have in it will be my mm u. It will require a concrete floor and footings. How thick should I pour the floor? How do I figure the amount of concrete required to pour the footings? I have been in on pouring enough concrete at this point I can get it done just fine. Have access to a roller and a whacker. I'm not a professional by any means so I have a few novice questions but I can handle the dirt work and finish work.
 
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Fawteen
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:40 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Barely qualify for amateur status here, but some help:

A good compacted base is probably as important as the floor thickness.

Thickness also depends to some degree on whether you're using plain concrete, fiber mix,
wire reinforcement or rebar. My garage is 4" of fiber mix over well compacted and drained
gravel and has been fine for 20+ years.

Amount of concrete needed is a relatively simple volume formula:

20x25 is 90 linear feet (2 20 foot sides, 2 25 foot sides). If we figure 6 inch width and
16 inch depth that's 90x.5x1.33 (inches converted to feet) or rounded off to 60 cubic
feet.

60 cubic feet divided by 27 (27 cubic feet in a cubic yard: 3x3x3) is 2.22 cubic yards.
I'd order 2.5 if your contractor will do partial yards.

Plug in your own figures when you've determined the final sizes.
 
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rustyfarmall
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:40 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Minimum 4" thick. 5" to 6" is better.
 
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stonerock
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 6:10 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Fawteen has it right , floor is no better than what it sets on, make sure you have compacted stone under
your slab, 4'' of concrete is just fine
 
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ed will
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 6:15 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Hi, just the flat area 20 x 25 is 500 □ ft.
One cu yd concrete at 4" thick = 80 □ft
or One cu meter at 4" thick = 100 □ ft

These figures represent a 2?4 form
If you want 6" thick just add another 1/2

I would recommend 6" mesh across the floor and
one 3/8" rebar across the door opening. On a hot
summer day the concrete gets hot at the opening
but in the shadow it remains cool so very often it
will crack at the opening without the rebar.
Compact the base so you don't see your foot prints
Ed Will Oliver Bc
 
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Leroy
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 6:27 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

For footer figure 8" wide not 6" and at least 24" depth and depending on frost depth deeper.
 
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LEON(MI)
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 6:56 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

when they poured my basement floor,they put plastic on top of the base to keep the moisture from coming thru.i think it helps keep the floor dry.
 
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teddy52food
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 7:07 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

My shop floor is 3 1/2 inches thick with the wire mesh. Poured it 1975. Has no cracks & I used to do work on a road grader with a snow plow & wing on it. Base is gravel. Get the ready mix with a little stronger mix & you don't need to go as thick.
 
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Traditional Farmer
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 7:46 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I worked at a concrete plant for 25 years,if I were going to pour a floor I'd pour 3500 lb mix with fiber and small stone something like 68's.Pick a warm day and add no CaCl or any type of
accelerator.Also would use super plasticizer.Also have a good solid pad use rebar and gravel base with plastic underneath the slab to make sure the concrete retains moisture to hydrate
like it should.Never listen to the finisher about how to pour the concrete as all they want to do is get it too wet,too much water ruins concrete.As a note I'd say 90% percent of non
inspected non commercial concrete is poured out of spec.
 
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Steve@Advance
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 8:22 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Something you might consider.

If your concrete provider has a minimum, and it's more that you need, pour an approach apron. It will come in as a handy place to do quick jobs if the shop is occupied, make entry easier, especially if the vehicle isn't running.

Also have a slight slope toward the door. That will keep water out, and make washdown easier.

Really get fancy, have a raised area around the perimeter for storage. work benches, etc. That way if water does come in, or when doing washdown, those areas stay dry.
 
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David G
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:02 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

You should be fine with 3 1/2 thick floor, I would insulate under it, and put a floor drain under each stall so wet stays under car.
 
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DRussell
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 10:41 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Plan for the future. If you think you will ever get a car lift make the ceiling high enough to accommodate it. 12 feet of interior height is typically minimum. At least 4" of cement is typical.
 
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Russ from MN
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 10:48 am    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

As someone else said, put poly under it! I used 1/2 rebar, and around the perimeter 1 close to the bottom and one near the top, and
throughout on 2 foot centers. If they use road salt in your area it will soak down into the cracks and rust off mesh in time. If you don't
have freeing temperatures you have less problems. My shop floor is a foot thick around the edges and then 4 inches in the center, and I
sloped it to a pit in the center to collect water that drips off of snow covered equipment.
 
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Flannelman
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I would insulate around the edges to help with frost creep. My current garage has insulation around the edges and it helps the slab stay warmer and not sweat. Something else is to put a course of block around the edges. That will help in the future that water won't ever work its way under the walls. One last thing is slope the slab to a floor drain or towards the door. My current garage runs towards the house entry door and when its winter I have to put a line of spray foam on the floor to redirect the water.
 
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Pete in MD
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Location: Millersville, MD

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Concrete Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Fawteen,

I don't understand your method of computing the volume of a 25'x20'x4" slab.
I come up with 166.5 cubic feet or 6.17 yards of concrete and would order 7 yards. This doesn't include footers.

Pete
 
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