Yesterday's Tractor Co.
Shop Now View Cart
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 9N,2N,8N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   Traditional YT Forum ViewClassic View   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile    Log inLog in 

Keeping him down on the farm

Goto page 1, 2  Next

 
Post new topic    
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
showcrop
Tractor Guru


Joined: 13 Dec 2000
Posts: 20349
Location: Chester NH

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:28 am    Post subject: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

What are you doing to try to keep your son (or maybe daughter,) on the farm so that you can transition to him? It goes without saying that the farm life is not for everyone, and the chances that your son will be one who will ultimately take the farm over are most likely under 50%, but it sure is good for everyone when the transition happens and it goes smoothly. I had hoped that my son would step into my business, but it was not to be, so at age 55 I sold out. I have seen others whose son wanted no part of it, yet when the father suddenly died or became incapacitated, he came back and seemed to do well. I have also seen where the father gives the son no say, or responsibility, or input into decision making, so the son seems to slowly drift away. On the other hand if you were to give the son responsibility for the decisions on a major part of the operation, and then he makes a major mistake the consequences can be grave. What is your plan and how are you implementing it and how does it seem to be working?
 
Back to top
View user's profile
oldproudvet
Long Time User


Joined: 05 Sep 2010
Posts: 1072


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:47 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Other than proper upbringing so the family truly "shares" in the farm/business being able to show a son
or daughter than they can make a living and support a family is #1. Have taught Ag/diesel mech in a
vocational setting in outstate MN for 35 years or so, lots of farm families have passed through......
Love of the life and the farm is one thing, but being able to support themselves and their family is
paramount. Lots of success out there. So many times the kids have to leave for a while in search of
themselves and figure out who they are. When they return it's amazing. The ag world, like society is
changing so fast, they must remain flexible. The kids that keep there head in the sand and want to farm
just like Grandpa and Dad have the least chance of success. They can slip into the farm/business but
they have to be aware of how fast the world is changing, and how the volatile the politics of govt support is etc
etc etc
 
Back to top
View user's profile
544hydro
Regular


Joined: 20 Jan 2016
Posts: 177


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:54 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

living in the country and owning land was my dream. I was lucky enough to make it happen. I don't know what my sons dream will be since he's only 7. I want him to be happy and enjoy whatever it may be.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
moresmoke
Long Time User


Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 1394


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:02 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Same as any other business, kick them out for a number of years, then see if they still want to come back. The old guy in charge also needs to remember it will be a team effort for a while. There are very few
businesses where one person makes all the major decisions. While Junior may make a bad decision, chances are just as good he will have a stroke of genius and think of something Pops never thought of. They both
need to listen to each other and work together.

I come from a fammily business background. The business will probably close when the 2nd generation retires. There are members of the 3rd generation that work there, but none that want to take over. The
perspective is very different once you have distanced yourself from it. We've all seen the outfits where Pops can't understand why the youngun decided to retire from being the hired man. You know, still the
youngun at 65.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Eric in IL
Tractor Expert


Joined: 02 Dec 2005
Posts: 1782


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:03 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I don't think parents should try to "sell" their kids on any certain vocation. I understand the want and need to do so especially when it comes time to pass the torch. I just don't think I could be proud of myself if I had coaxed a kid into something they weren't really wanting to do for the working years of their life.

I suppose I think like this because it is the way I was raised.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
RCP
Long Time User


Joined: 24 Feb 2000
Posts: 1223
Location: Western Pa

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:14 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

How do you make the process fair if there is more than one child in the family? It is unlikely that they could all
become "owners" of the farm, but they all have an interest in the farm.

Rich
 
Back to top
View user's profile
1946 BN IHC
Regular


Joined: 28 May 2013
Posts: 207


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:31 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

In addition to all that has been stated I have mised the
farm. My parents because of my father's poor back health
made the desission to sell out a family 150 year old
family farm in 1965 when I was 12. Later on I had the
opertunity to lead one of two poltery 4H clubs in the
county I lived in in Ontario Canada.
Yes I, even now have tmes I in my 60,s mis the farm :YET
because of God's hand and leading in my life I have had a
pleasent life.
To add to this my wife Brenda had at verious times said
she wished she had known me earlier and that we could
have been able to keep the farm, she grew up on the
Guelph agricultural campis often going to the barns to
feed and help with the animals.
Be as that may the start up costs today ( from 1970 to
2018) are steep. To purchase a 50 acher piece of land
with house and even a sugestion of a barn would often be
blocked by the powers that govern the counties: their
thoughts "one can't make a livng on 50 "achers". Raising
Irish Dexter Cattle it was porjected that the turn over
was sufficient to thrive on.
Any way that's enough rant from me.
Have a wonderful week end all.
Wm
 
Back to top
View user's profile
rrlund
Tractor Guru


Joined: 21 Dec 2006
Posts: 37851


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:00 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I don't know what would have happened if my Dad hadn't said what he did to my oldest son before he passed away. Both of the boys had decided they didn't want anything to do with it and left. We were seriously thinking of selling everything and moving south to raise cattle down there. Then the oldest boy said he wanted the place. He said that Dad had told him that he always thought that he'd end up farming the place some day,so it put the spark in him. He didn't want to milk cows,that's for darned sure,but he's got two beef cows here and some cattle in the feedlot.
I've told him that if he wants to own the place,he might have to wait until I die and get it when he's about 60. He said that'd be fine with him,he'd farm it when he retires.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
steve706
Long Time User


Joined: 20 Feb 2010
Posts: 745


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:09 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I find the powers to be statement a bit of an overreach and a bit of an exaggeration. The majority of counties and townships in Ontario wouldn?t have an issue with smaller farms for the mere fact that it increases their tax base. The more people + buildings = more tax collected compared to giant acreage farms with less people and buildings on the land. Can?t see why they would care what was done with the land as long as it?s within the bylaws and property taxes paid.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
rrlund
Tractor Guru


Joined: 21 Dec 2006
Posts: 37851


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:17 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Ya,I've heard where some of the big successful family operations make the kids go to college then work for somebody else for two years before they'll even think of taking them in to the operation.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Bruce from Can.
Tractor Guru


Joined: 09 Jul 2009
Posts: 7055


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:17 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Well I guess I am very much one of the folks you are asking this question of. First off , I am not
doing anything to keep my son "down on the farm " , I told all three of my boys not to ever think that
they were saying on the farm for me, if they want to be on the farm , it is for themselves. Oldest son
is going to stay on the farm , and the next two boys would rather do just about anything else but stay
and work long hours and weekends on the farm. So they left. My second son likes to run equipment, and
has knocked around from job to job, and some times when things get tough for him, I find some work on
the farm for him. But as soon as he can , he jumps to another job, and that's ok. My youngest works in
a local feed mill , steady work ,decent pay , good benefits , and a pension plan. He gets regular
hours, and all the over time he wants ,works for him.
So back to the son on the farm. I think we will form a ltd. and put our milk cows and quota , as well
as the farm equipment and one of our farms into the ltd. and I will pass him 40% ownership for the work
he has put into the farm so far , he has been with me full time for ten years on next to no pay so this
isn't a gift, and his brothers are aware of what we are doing. As time goes by eldest boy can buy out
my side if he likes , or my wife and I could will it to him. We still have another farm , a house lot,
and some investments , so are other boys could be given some thing from this pool. What I see is , if a
son isn't interested enough in the farm to come and help out at say harvest time, why should he expect
to benefit from the $$ value in the farm ? My two off farm boys will have to wait till I am gone to
inherit from my wife and I , and not have any claim on the farm ltd , as they were not interested in
building it. In some ways, I kind of wish my oldest didn't want to farm.I would be ready to winded it
up. So because he does want to farm, I started to pass much of the day to day management over to him,
he will need to know how to do every thing on this farm , so he may as well start while I am here to
help. We are looking hard at putting up a new barn , and that will ease the work load, and give me the
chance to back away. I am 57 now and I would like to see this new barn and transition all done and
working by the time I turn 60. That will give me 40 years of 7 days a week dairy farming, and I can
then become a part time worker, and full time share holder. This is our plan , if we cannot pull it all
together, we have two other options , downsize to what my son can do on his own, or just quit and sell
out, last resort. First option is the one we , my wife and I and the oldest boy want. And as I said ,
the other boys have opted to not be on the farm, so the farm business is not their concern , as I am
still the sole owner.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Crazy Horse
Long Time User


Joined: 27 Oct 2007
Posts: 1466


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:24 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Here's a musical version of the question as to keeping the boy on the farm ........ pretty cool ! There might be a You Tube ad in there
first that you might have to wait for .......
You Tube ...... Keepin him on the farm ????

 
Back to top
View user's profile
Bruce from Can.
Tractor Guru


Joined: 09 Jul 2009
Posts: 7055


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:30 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Fair ?? fair is a place were you ride the merry go round , and they judge Chocolate cakes ! this is Business. If one kid stays on the farm and works his guts out,and increasing the assets and value of the farm as on my farm , while the other two are too busy running after girls, and partying and having fun, why should they get a equal share ? Lets decide what is "fair" and what is "equal". Then decide how everyone should be treated. My dad decided that we should all get nothing till he was dead, and then ever thing had to be sold, and money split up among the five of us evenly, seems fair, and equal. But he sold one farm to my brother at below market value, before he passed , and gave my sister a house lot. Still seem fair? Who ever said life was or had to be fair or equal ?
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Bruce from Can.
Tractor Guru


Joined: 09 Jul 2009
Posts: 7055


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:35 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

After seeing that there was so many easier ways to live WW1 soldiers didn't want to go back to hard luck farms , and eck out a poor living. I am sure the same thing happened after WW 2 as well.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
rrlund
Tractor Guru


Joined: 21 Dec 2006
Posts: 37851


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 8:09 am    Post subject: Re: Keeping him down on the farm Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Ya,Dad took a factory job and bought a house in town after he came back from the war. Grandpa's health got so bad that he couldn't keep it going. Dad was the youngest of 6 and all the others had farms of their own by that time,so in 48 he came back and my grandparents moved in to town.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic    Yesterday's Tractors Forum Index -> Tractor Talk All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  

TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). Expedited shipping available, just call! Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors. Compare our super low shipping rates! We have the parts you need to repair your tractor. We are a company you can trust and have generous return policies. Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651. [ About Us ]

YT Home  |  Forums

Modern View Forum powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters