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Mig wire

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Mike(NEOhio)
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Joined: 12 May 2013
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Location: Geauga County, Ohio

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 6:26 am    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

There seems to be some misunderstanding about the cored wires. There is flux cored wire (FCAW) example, Lincoln's Innershield line. There is also cored wire that requires shielding gas like MIG (GMAW) where the core is made up of metal and some other chemicals but it's not flux, Lincoln's Metal Core line. Yes, different polarity and techniques. Flux core should be dragged like with stick. MIG welds better when pushed unless it's vertical down.
 
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Greenfrog
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 8:11 am    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I took an adult education class at a local community college on wire welding. I grew up with our Forney stick welder and wanted to get a little education on mig, etc....
The experienced instructor said that no matter what brand of welder, and they had well known brands in the shop as well as some donated new off brands, he said always use Lincoln brand wire. Even if it is a Harbor Freight welder. Lincoln is the hidden secret to success.
 
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JD Seller
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 8:39 am    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I have ran Hobart wire now for 20 plus years. I can not see any reason to run flux core wire. Just makes a wire weld messy like a stick weld. LOL. I guess in some windy conditions you might be better with flux core. I usually just shield the weld with one hand and weld with the other.
 
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M-MAN
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 5:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Picked up spool of Lincoln innershield and one of Hobart's just to play with and see how well they do. I want to try welding metal that isn't laboratory clean. That's one of the reasons I don't care as much about mig welding. It's great for new stuff but for repairs not so much. Reckon the old 6011's spoiled me there. They don't care what the metal looks like. I probably won't get it but I want a mig wire that will perform just like a 6011.
 
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JD Seller
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 7:35 pm    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

There is no MIG wire that will burn through junk like a 6011 rod will. All you have to do is take a grinder and knock off the rust/paint and the MIG will do fine., The extra speed from not changing rods and knocking scale off will make the MIG twice as fast. I rarely use my stick welder anymore.
 
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Oliver 500 Wa
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Location: Vancouver, Washington

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2018 9:56 pm    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CVPost-M-MAN wrote:
.....I want to try welding metal that isn't laboratory clean. That's one of the reasons I don't care as much about mig welding. It's great for new stuff but for repairs not so much.


I repair lots of stuff with MIG. ER70S6 with 75/25 gas. The only thing that gives it trouble is super badly rusted stuff. The worst I do are rusted out floors in wood chip trucks. Those I pretty much have to cut back to something solid or often remove and replace the entire floor because there is really nothing left to weld to.

Anything else, I just hit with the grinder till I get sparks then blow off with air. Weld up as needed and put it back to work.
 
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M-MAN
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 3:14 am    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Now you done went and busted my bubble before I even start playing with it. Lol

I do just hit it with the side grinder and go. I just don't get carried away with it so there's always some spots where it sputters and then it seems like I always notice something else that needs a bead so I have to grab the grinder again.

Just going to play with clean, semi clean, and dirty to see what it will do on thinner metal. If it's acceptable it will be worthwhile to keep around just in case I need to weld something now and the tank is empty. The old Lincoln 250 stick won't be retiring in my lifetime.
 
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Stan in Oly, WA
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 11:50 am    Post subject: Re: Mig wire Reply to specific post Reply with quote

M-MAN; The same thing that makes MIG (but not flux-core so much) better than stick for sheet metal is that the small size of the wire does not require as large an arc to melt the metal. Even if you compare .030 wire (larger than the .023 a lot of small wire feed welders use) with 3/32" stick which is the smallest stick commonly kept on hand, the stick has almost ten times the mass per linear unit as the wire. The arc energy it takes to melt the stick is so much greater that there is energy to burn through dirt, rust, paint, grease, etc. The energy of the wire feed is low enough that there not only is not energy to burn through those things, but it takes careful operation to prevent leaving melted metal on the surface of the work without it being fused to the base metal. The reason flux core is not as good as solid wire for sheet metal is that it runs hotter so it burns through easier.

Stan
 
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