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Tough beef

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36 Coupe
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 3:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

You never butcher boar pigs.When they stop breeding they are best shot and buried.Any farm boy knows that here.Pigs feed can affect the taste of their meat.
 
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Texasmark1
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 5:50 am    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I used to raise Duroc hogs. I'd buy them wiened and raise them up to 200-220 and have them butchered and the hams and chops cured.

Used to use a feed named "Farley's Show Gilt" which was a finely ground pure corn product with nutrients sold by a grain barn by the name of Farley. Hams were superb. Cuts were nice and clean, good texture, meat had an iridescent shine to it where you cut it....superb flavor and that was the first time I had cured pork chops and they were fabulously delicious.

So one year I decided to feed Milo. No way Jose. Meat was horrible.

Mark
 
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jackinok
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:31 am    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

all i can say is ,welcome to the real world.LOL you should have planted your corn for all it did.couple of things that may help..first, forget the angus beef thing,its pure hoax. Believe it or not there was a study done about forty years ago now.Results were taught in all the ag colleges. The no. one overall prefered beef,across the whole study group in every category ,was believe it or not a JERSEY STEER!!! Time after time it won out over all the competition. BUT!!!! this was at a time when grass fed beef was on its way out,and corn fed beef was just really coming in. dont know if you know it or not,but the switch to corn fed beef was strictly because of not the consumer,but the way the consumer SHOPPED!thats right, look back at the history af supermarkets. folks were getting refrigerators and freezers,so they bought their meat not in daily quantities but for a week or two at a time. So market owners wanted beef that (A) LOOKED good on the shelf,(B) that kept well(C) that they could sell in vast quantities year round. thats what drove the american market..taste was not really a high priority consideration. It appears that the market youve built up wants grass fed beef,without all the additives. well guess what, late fifties-early sixties was a time of huge change in the market,not only in the way meat was sold,but how it was finished for market. Instead of cattle being sort of a spring or fall crop it had to be available year round. first some enterprising person found they could start the tenderizing process of meat believe it or not ,while it was still alive. This required a couple of things,first a highly marbled meat for the emzines to work on,and a way to hold these cattle confined. (so the so called beef cattle feed lot industry was born).before this time cattle were held in pens,but only long enough to move them from the pens through the slaughter house.It was ALSO found that by taking certain chemicals and injecting into the meat at slaughter time,the aging time of meat could be signifantly shortened,and the temps at which aging could take place could be much higher. for instance our affore mentioned jersey could go through a aging process that instead of thirty to forty days at 40-45 degrees,with chemical aging it could be aged in one day at 70 degrees. great for the market ,but not real great for the consumer.meat was dry,and tasteless.so to counter this,packers found they could chemically tenderize/age meat,THEN put moisture back in.(pink slime ring any bells?) since all this chemical manipulation relied on the marbling of meat,meat type cows became the norm.angus lends itself very well to this type of chemical manipulation SIMPLY because they tend to be a standard size and weight,evenly marbled,etc.so the myth of angus beef was born! in your case,since your using it without all the additives you dont get the tenderizing,flavoring,etc benifits chemicals provide so you meat is no tender than ANY other.IN YOUR CASE,angus is probably quite honestly a drawback! (and before the fight starts let me explain how).,so would be any of the so called beef breeds of cattle. marbling adds taste,but the taste comes NOT from the cow/bull etc.it comes from the feed the cow eats. for you a breed that has LESS marbling would give a better flavor,it could be aged LONGER because less marbling would mean less chance of meat turning rancid before it aged. You could finish a steer in say ten to fifteen days in a feedlot by putting steers on a full grain diet to get rid of any wild taste that may be in the small amount of fat.since you had less time between moving them off pasture and slaughter,meat would be more tender since its been proven time and again exercised beef is naturally more tender. age those steers for say 30 days before packaging at 45 degrees or so and youll have a better product.in other words, to make a long story short ,you cant cut corners . steak starts in the parents,follows through to a mother with plenty of milk for a strong healthy growth,right on to good pasture,into clean lots with the right grain,through slaughter ,aging,packaging and your table. cut a corner anywhere and its a worse outcome instead of better.
 
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bison
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 12:09 pm    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

As one poster said,...who says you got your own beef back?
Butchers that run a meat counter to boot can't be trusted.
Stress with loading ,transport and the way they were treated prior to and how they were killed can a big factor in how the meat turns out.
There is nothing wrong with grass fed beef,but beef that hung for 28 days makes the best meat.
Being black angus is no garantie against being tough,it happens with all breeds.
Age has no bearing on toughness either.
I ate many an older cow that was tender.
Intact bulls are on average not the best eating, i prefer a heifer.
 
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Daryl in PA
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 12:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

You guys are making me hungry!!


 
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RodinNS
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 12:58 pm    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'm not an advocate for grass fed beef... but I certainly won't sit here and say it can't be done. It is done... and done very widely thoughout the world except in north america...
From the information I've read over the years, the main component in getting a good carcass that will grade out well is consistent ADG from birth through to slaughter. Info I've read, albeit from the grass farmer type books... suggest that if ADG falls below 1 #/day you're going to run into problems with carcass quality. If you can keep them gaining 2.5-3#/day the quality on grass should be equal to feedlot beef with the exception that the fat will be more yellow...
The reason for angus and the other british breeds is that they can make that kind of gain on lush grass. The continental breeds, due to their higher body maintenance needs have a very hard time making gain on anything but the very best pasture... but they do respond very well to diets high in energy... meaning CORN.

The challenge as I see it with grass finishing of cattle is not in that it can't be done... it's a matter of keeping a forage in front of the beast that can provide enough energy. In a northern climate, THAT is a challenge. It's easy to keep forage here for 4-5 months that will probably do the job but after that it gets dicey...

Rod
 
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 2:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I used to buy piglets from a fellow who fed potato waste to sows.When one stopped breeding he butchered her.He said whenever he cooked some of her meat it smelled like potatoes cooking.I had a Jersey cow that liked dandelions,it flavored her milk.Same problem with milk goats.
 
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bison
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 6:58 pm    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This Dutch double muscle cattle is what i call "real beef. Wink
It'll put anything to shame that runs around on this continent in taste and tenderness Very Happy
Never mind the 85% yield.
 


Last edited by bison on Tue Oct 09, 2012 7:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
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jackinok
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 5:25 am    Post subject: Re: Tough beef Reply to specific post Reply with quote

very true! that in a nutshell "IS" the problem with grass fed beef,and always has been.years ago most beef was slaughtered spring and fall,when grass was at its most nutritious. a lot of packing plants even ran on a part time basis.But the modern supermarket ,the home refrigeration units ,etc made a year long market possible. instead of housewives going to the butcher shop,where the butcher normally aged the meat, and buying what meat was in season,or holding a side of beef in a locker. so to keep a year round supply folks simply started keeping cattle in feed lots,chemicaly tenderizing/aging/etc. the timing of grass fed beef slaughter is a huge factor in the tenderness and flavor. thats why in most of the world beef is not the primary meat source.its a seasonal product,supplanted largely by goat thats been slow cooked in most recipes to make it tender.the US is the only nation where beef is a primary meat source,though its becoming more and more accepted around the world. as you say,they largely use grass fed beef,simply because the feed to keep one in a feed lot is simply too expensive. You cannot in most cases ,handle grass fed beef as you would a steer fed out and finished in a feedlot for 100 or more days.
 
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