Yesterday's Tractor Co. Parts for Farm Tractors - Compare our Prices!
Click Here or call 800-853-2651 
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 9N,2N,8N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   Traditional YT Forum ViewClassic View   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

damper in a stove pipe???


 
Post new topic    
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
dave2
Tractor Guru


Joined: 05 Feb 2006
Posts: 13550
Location: Kutzberg, Germany 1972 IHC 423 (German). 2.5 Liter 3cyl direct injection diesel 42HP

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 10:55 am    Post subject: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

What purpose does the damper serve??? Asking because we have an older stove that doesn't have one. Does the damper just compensate (??) for a stove that isn't air tight? Or does it keep heat from going up the chimney??
SWMBO is complaining that the stove doesn't heat as fast as her glass fronted one in the living room.... Keep telling her that it's not the same type of stove and she needs to be patient, but if a damper in the pipe would help.... I'll put one in..... stove itself is tight tho..... Just one that takes a day or so to warm everything up and keep comfortable.....
 
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Walt Davies
Tractor Guru


Joined: 13 Oct 2004
Posts: 4417


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:02 am    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

The damper does just what the name says it dampens down
stove so that all the heat doesn't go right up the chimney. Let
your stove get up to heat then close down the damper just
above where it starts to smoke. This will slow the burning rate
and keep more heat in the stove where it warm the house not
the outside.
They are very easy to install.
Walt
 
Back to top
View user's profile
farmall300u
Regular


Joined: 29 Feb 2008
Posts: 95


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:03 am    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

the main purpose of a damper on a wood stove is to control the rate of burn. With the damper wide open or missing, the fire's CO2 goes straight up the flue pipe where as when closed, tends to smother the fire.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
dpendzic
Long Time User


Joined: 05 Mar 2009
Posts: 911


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:06 am    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

a damper in the stove pipe is used to slow the fire down. Important if the stove is not airtight and over fires. Otherwise it's not needed and tends to accumulate creosote. I took mine out on my small vermont castings to get it to run hotter.

there are fan driven stove pipe adapters that get more heat out of the stovepipe but be careful of creosote buildup in your chimney.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
thesmoothedeere
Long Time User


Joined: 04 Aug 2010
Posts: 693


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:11 am    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

From what i understand the newer stoves like mine don't want you to use dampers. All air flow should be controlled at the stove.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
donjr
Tractor Guru


Joined: 20 Nov 2011
Posts: 6875


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 1:05 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

The damper doesn't really make that much difference. The draft however, does. Once you get your fire started, cut the draft on the front of the stove down and the fire will bank down on it's own. If there is less draft, less air comes into the stove, and less goes up the chimney. So more of the heat being given off transfers to the steel and therefore into your heating space. Open the damper, and close down on the draft.....
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Ted in NE-OH
Guest






Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 1:08 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If you dampen too much you fill the room with smoke. Air tight stoves have a built in damper on the air intake.
 
Back to top
Unruh
Regular


Joined: 22 Feb 2005
Posts: 324


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 1:38 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Why does my barrel shop stove puff smoke out of the air intake until it gets hot? Is my 6" smoke pipe too small? The stove is an old 230 gallon oblong stove fuel tank.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
buickanddeere
Tractor Guru


Joined: 31 May 2003
Posts: 26069
Location: in front of computer

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 1:48 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

It's back drafting until the flue is hot enough to flow sufficient combustion air into the stove.
Ideal stack has no bends or horizontal sections. And runs above the condensation point of creosote. Taller is usually better.
6" is on the small side unless the fires are always small, hot and clean burning with the air intake open.
It can't be avoided on a natural draft stove . Some combustion heat has to be used to hear the stack to make the stove draw. Instead of the heat warming your building.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
36 Coupe
Tractor Guru


Joined: 12 Mar 2010
Posts: 6861


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 2:25 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Dont beleive every thing you read on this forum.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
rusted nuts
Tractor Guru


Joined: 05 Mar 2009
Posts: 16775


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 3:06 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I think you've got it right.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
BushogPapa
Tractor Guru


Joined: 26 Dec 2001
Posts: 5876


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 3:10 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Used correctly on a fairly air-tight stove, a damper should be left open until the fire is burning well and the stove is heated..
Then, the damper should be progressively closed as the stove continues to heat up..
At some point, you will notice the heat output go UP..as the stove goes into "Secondary Combustion"..
That is the point where you want the damper closed and the coals will last a long time..and the fire will not roar up the chimney..
My old "Atlanta Stove" has an automatic air inlet damper that regulates the fire well, but I always operate the Stove-Pipe damper to get the best out of the hot stove..
Ron..
 
Back to top
View user's profile
36 Coupe
Tractor Guru


Joined: 12 Mar 2010
Posts: 6861


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 3:30 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Wrong..
 
Back to top
View user's profile
showcrop
Tractor Guru


Joined: 13 Dec 2000
Posts: 10674


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 5:39 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote


It is true that you should be controlling combustion rate with the stove's built in draft control. But with either draft control or damper as others have said get it going good then dampen it down some. BUUUUUUT at least once a day let it roar good for a few minutes so that flame will carry up the flue so that if you have accumulated any creosote it will burn it off. That way you will have a friendly chimney fire every day and you won't have bad one that you need to invite the fire department to.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
george md
Tractor Expert


Joined: 22 Oct 2001
Posts: 2119
Location: Whiteford , Md

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 7:21 pm    Post subject: Re: damper in a stove pipe??? Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Don,

Having fired stoves and furnaces for most
of the last 60 years , If you want to get the
heat out of the stove and not send it up the
flue, you will need a damper.

george
 
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic    Yesterday's Tractors Forum Index -> Tractor Talk All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
TRACTOR   PARTS TRACTOR   MANUALS
Same-Day Shipping! Most of our stocked parts ship the same day you order (M-F).  Expedited shipping available, just call!  Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors.  Compare our super low shipping rates!  We have the parts you need to repair your tractor.  We are a Company you can trust and have generous return policies!   Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651.

YT Home  |  Forums Home

Copyright © 1997-2014 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters