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Load bearing wall weight


 
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XFARMA
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Joined: 19 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 3:22 am    Post subject: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I would like to remove a load bearing sidewall in my shop and replace it with an I-Beam. The original building is 18x26 with storage overhead and I added a 12x26 addition on one side this summer. How do I figure out what I need for an I-Beam to support this building? Chuck
 
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gene bender
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 3:31 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

The length will be the factor how much clear span and what does load above it consist of. Other words what is above it and what will support the beam on each end. Go to your steel supplier and he would probably be able to answer you question.
 
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Billy NY
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 3:48 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Pretty easy for an engineer to check, calculate and verify loads imposed, straight to existing footings, actually check out. You would be wise to make sure, footings, foundations and columns on each end will support the load, as well as determining the beam shape, size etc., small building span etc., also wise to clearly label the steel beam so in the future someone does not rig off of it. To some it seems like overkill, but its too late if something were to fail, I would boldly guess this would be a small "coffee/beer money" task to calculate and check out for any licensed professional engineer qualified to do so.
 
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Billy NY
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 3:50 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Additionally, you may be able to access AISC reference material to size the beam, you need to know the load imposed on it and its only as good as the columns and footings the load is transferred to.
 
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Stephen Newell
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:17 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

A steel supplier won't give you advice on the size of an I beam you need. I think the cost of hiring an engineer to look at it would be better spent in steel. A I-beam is realitively cheap. If you have the means of handling it a 10" or 12" I-beam should handle anything. I put a 10-26 I-beam 20' in a house to hold up a second story. I had a engineer give the recomendation on that one. I also built a bridge on my property which span 24' with 2 12" I-beams which I've been driving vehicles over for years. The beams were less than $200.00 each. As far as handling it a 10"-26 I-beam weights 26 pounds per lin ft.
 
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gene bender
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:47 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I must have a better steel dealer than you have.
 
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Billy NY
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:56 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Or he has very good error and omission insurance.
 
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jackinok
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:57 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

would depend entirely on the load i would think. northern folks would need a much higher rated beam for the snow load for instance than ones in the south. overhead storage loads,etc could make a large difference.do a search on the net for I beam load carrying capacities, adjust them to your local codes /conditions,then add your est storage loads (+ maybe 10-20%).way too many variables without knowing your exact conditions,how beam is supported,etc etc.short answer get the biggest beam you can lay your hands on.
 
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willie in mn
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 6:01 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Pay an engineer for what he knows. There are a lot of factors that determine size needed. Weight of the bare roof, snow load in your location, support colunms, footings, soil type under footings, building codes, etc.
Any specs you get here are worth exactly what you pay-nothing. If it is not built strong enough, you are personally liable when it fails. Owner's insurance might be canceled. If anyone is injured or killed when it fails, you could be held liable for criminal negligence besides civil damages.
Don't be penny wise but dollar foolish.
End of rant.
Willie
 
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David G
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:13 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Hire a structural engineer, well worth the money.
 
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paul
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:35 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

26 foot span? Can you have a post in the middle and make it 2 13 foot spans?

Liabilty will keep anyone who really knows from saying anything. The rest of us would just be guessing.

The slope of your roof, wind load and/or snow load for your location all would make a huge difference.

Any of your friends have a building with a 26 or 28 foot side door on a sidewall, copy what they have?

That's a pertty good span.

--->Paul
 
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EX 450 Owner
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 8:35 am    Post subject: Re: Load bearing wall weight Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Use your internet browser to find LSB light steel beam. I have never used it but my SIL just used to replace a bearing wall. He went to a local lumber yard that was listed as one of 2 in our area that carried LSB and they gave him some software to calculate the size of beam he needed. When he decided to go that way the engineering department at the lumber yard confirmed his figures.

I cannot remember the height of the beam but it was 24 foot long and 2 guys carried it and put it in to place.

They told him if he wanted to cut down on the height of the beam he could put 2 units back to back and add wider support posts.
 
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