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Welding and turning a damaged shaft

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David1
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 8:08 am    Post subject: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I have a hay rake axle that has about a 4 in lenght that is scarred up. What should it cost to get that welded and turned back down to size? Thanks
 
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ihman73
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 8:24 am    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

People might make fun of me but on low speed low stress shafts I have welded up and ground it down close with an angle grinder. It isn't right for every application but works fine in some. We call it "hillbilly machinework".
 
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david1
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:23 am    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I like the way you think. Would I be better off to get it built up brazing it with a brass rod and filing it down or use an electic rod and grind it.
 
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rustyfarmall
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:05 am    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

ihman73 wrote:
(quoted from post at 09:24:33 11/27/12) People might make fun of me but on low speed low stress shafts I have welded up and ground it down close with an angle grinder. It isn't right for every application but works fine in some. We call it "hillbilly machinework".


An angle grinder is quite often referred to as a "poor man's milling machine"

If there is no great amount of precision required, welding it up and grinding it down is as good a way as any to return a machine to productivity.
 
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sd pete
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I have done it both ways. My Grinder is much faster than a rusty old file.
 
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Stick welding
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Don't braze it. It will be too soft and wear out real fast.
 
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tbish
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 2:29 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

when u grind it down use a flap disc it will do a smoother job
 
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dboll
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 3:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

no it's not unless your machinery doesn't mean much to you, a pivot pin in a hitch or linkage maybe yes, a shaft that turns or holds a bearing or bushing definately not
 
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ihman73
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 4:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

My weapon of choice is my wire welder and angle grinder with grinding discs unless a smoother surface is required then use the flap disc to finish up. Is it perfect, no but as the saying goes "poor people have poor ways".
 
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JMS/.MN
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:20 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I believe in fixing things right...the first time. Not having to do it again later, sometimes after ripping up even more. Plus taking it apart again and finally fixing it like it should have been done in the first place. Just call a machine shop for a price- they've done gazillion before you and can give you an accurate price. No grinder is a turning lathe. Eyeballing doesn't come in a thousandth of an inch tolerance, which is common for fitting a bearing.
 
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60 acre hillside
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:28 am    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If the shaft is reasonably simple it may be cheaper to make a new one, Just 4 inches!
 
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RodinNS
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Depends on what it's used for... and how it's damaged. If this is something that simply has a gash down the length of it and you need to slide a bearing over it... I'd just grind it smooth with a flap disc and slide the bearing on provided it will fit tight. On the other hand... if the bearing has turned on the shaft and worn the radius down you would be better off making a new shaft or at least building this one up and turning it properly. I've built up and ground down with flap discs for fitting sprockets and that type of thing... but to fit a bearnig you need a concentric surface. If you don't have that the bearing will point load and crack the inner race because it's not properly supported... Again... that's a factor of the load applied and the size of the bearing. Sometimes you get away with it but in my experience that's not very often.
Another cheap/nasty trick to get moving, if need be... wrap the shaft in shim stock and fill with green Loctite (Sleeve and Bsaring retaining compound)... That will take up some slack and set it so it works for a while.

Rod
 
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Don-Wi
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

One thing not mentioned, and lots of guys are making assumptions, but WHERE on the shaft? WHAT rides there? Bearing? Bushing? Sprocket/gear?

In a pinch, it works and if money is tight, by all means do it. Being a machinist I try to do it right if at all possible but even I have had to weld & grind something down in a pinch.

Some guys are ready to condemn a practice, but some times it's all a guy can do to get the equipment back in the field. While I would build it up and spin it in a lathe if at all possible, it's-your equipment...-your budget...-and your time... Do what suits you and gets the job done.

Donovan from Wisconsin
 
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david1
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Its a NH rake axle and the bad place is where the frame bearing attaches to the axle. The axle housing broke and they used a couple muffler clamps to hold it together and they really ate into the axle a place about 4 in wide. I googled info and there is alot of conflicting info on how to weld/build up an axle.
 
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Don-Wi
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 6:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Welding and turning a damaged shaft Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Don't think of it as an axle, but just a shaft. I would be very surprised if it's anything more than 1018 cold rolled shaft. If you have a wire feed, that's the best way to go.

Don't turn the welder all the way up, and skip around alot. Weld a line on one side, then do another 180 degrees off, then go maybe 90, then 180, etc... until it's built up. Don't go too fast, and try not to get the whole area glowing red. Best if done on a flat table.

For any kind of a bearing (bushing) surface, I'd like to see it turned down myself.

Where are you located?

Donovan from Wisconsin
 
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