Yesterday's Tractor Co.
Shop Now View Cart
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 9N,2N,8N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   Traditional YT Forum ViewClassic View   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile    Log inLog in 

My First Day At Hobart

Goto page 1, 2  Next

 
Post new topic    
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Lanse
Tractor Guru


Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 4989
Location: Brookville, OH

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:13 am    Post subject: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Hey everyone!!

So, its nice and late in the morning, and I'm just now getting up. Thats exactly the way I like it, which is good because as of yesterday, I attend the Hobart School of Welding 5 days a week, from 4pm to midnight. Dont get me wrong, I *can* get up bright and early (I managed 14 years of regular school like that), I simply don't like to. It works out nice, because the evening classes at Hobart are smaller in size and theres less of a wait to get in.

Yesterday was my first day.

A lot of people don't know this, but I worked as a "Team Member" for the local Tractor Supply from April 17, until November 23. I wandered in there one afternoon on my way home from school probably for some kind of welding supplies, and the cashier looked at me and was like "Soooo.... Do you want a job?" I thought for a minute then left my name and number and stopped in the next day to talk to their manager. My first shift was like three days after that.

A lot of people complain about part time retail work, but truth be told, I loved every day of working at that place. My co-workers were really nice, and while I did have the occasional as$hat customer, most of them were really nice too. I almost always worked the evening shift because I was willing to, and the work was never really that hard. The hardest thing about it was either stocking feed (moving 500+ pounds of it in 50lb bags), or trying to maintain your sanity staring at a cash register at night when business was slow.

Few pictures exist of me working there, heres one I snapped with my cell phone as I was walking in for my last shift on Black Friday:



I've actually thought about sitting down in front of a camera and making a video talking about my time there, but anyway, I told my boss I was quitting sometime early in November (gave him like 3+ weeks notice), and he seemed happy for me and asked if I got another job. I told him I was going to Hobart, and he wished me the best. He was really cool, I bet if I'd stayed there for another year or two I coulda been a manager. I thought about it, and although the 7 or 8 months I was there were pretty sweet, Im not sure I'd want to make a career out of retail. If I wasn't doing welding, Id probably want to do marketing.

Anyway...

While you work at TSC, you and your immediate family gets a 15% off discount on anything. The very day I told my mom I got my job there, the first thing she said was "Cool, so you can get me all that fence for less, right?" That was in April. I told her what my last day was, and said I was NOT going there on black friday except for when I had to work. So, with 12 hours notice, we planned to do it the next morning.

I bought a nice little DeWalt angle grinder...

She bought two truckloads of fence, 50ish posts, a ton of wire, a few gates, a 3 month supply of dog food, dog food containers, chicken feeders, etc. All told we spent like $1200 there while we could, and I got to unload everything lol.

I was told later by another employee that in all the years she'd worked there (I feel bad for her, she went to 4 years of college and couldnt find a job, so now she works part time at TSC), no one had EVER made use of that discount more in a single day than we had, before they left. I also had the shortest stay at that store in YEARS of anyone who didnt get fired.

"Look what I found!!!"






Now, on to Hobart.

Yesterday, pretty much all day I was pumped.

I'd never been to Troy except to look at the school last summer, but my mom said it takes about 45 minites to drive there, but I should plan an hour. I ended up giving myself like an hour and 15 minites, and showed up way early. It was a nice little drive, but its still much closer than the nearest LWS, Steel yard, Best Buy, Shopping Mall, etc.

They said to be there by 3 for orientation, but my papers said it was 3:15. Another student later told me was told it was 3:30. I was like "greattt, we're off to an awesome start".

Showed up about 2:35, which is, ironically the time my old high school let class out. Here's a picture I took on my way in:



Anyway, I sat in my truck for a while then got bored and decided to wander inside. I saw a door for students, and walked through it. Inside was a brightly lit, battleship gray hallway, with a bunch of people walking around. I walked about 15 feet down it, then turned around and wandered into the office. The lady behind the desk directed me to a classroom down that hall and then a different one... I looked through the window in the door and it looked pretty empty... I wandered inside and it WAS empty. I was the first one there.

I pulled up a chair and sat down, got my iphone out and started browsing through Facebook. After a couple moments of this, the door opened and another lost looking kid appeared. "Is this orientation" he asked kinda sheepishly. "I hope so".

He sat down and introduced himself, he's a musician from Raleigh, North Carolina.

Shortly thereafter, this huge guy walked in, with a shaved head and covered in Tattoos. He's an Ex-Marine in his late 20's with a family to support here thanks to the GI bill. Shortly after him, a 30ish guy who said $12/hour at a warehouse "Just doesn't cut it".

Thats how a lot of the students were. Most were young, in their 20's or just out of high school like the musician and myself, and a few others. Probably 60% had never welded before. From what everyone said, I have the most prior education and the second most experience in the whole group.

We all went around and talked about ourselves, there was an Ex-MP who JUST got back from Germany like a few weeks ago. He's really nice, a bunch of us got dinner from the local Taco Bell and he told a bunch of stories from his time over there. The oldest was a 55 year old self called "gearhead" who just got laid off... And decided on another career rather than another job.

After the orientation (nothing special... No alcohol on school grounds... If you come in with a gun and shoot the place up, you'll be "dismissed" from the course, etc), we went to our first class, well, we only have one class a day so I guess its our only class, which is Blueprint reading. I sat next to a friendly bio-engineering student that went through 4 years of college, and couldn't find a job. So, he drove from San Diego, 37 hours to Ohio to start school here.

During orientation, our instructor said something like "We all believe you're responsable and mature, and..."

I kinda chuckled to myself, then I looked around and no one else was amused. I was like "Holy ****, we are" and that was an awesome moment. Its great to NOT be in High School anymore. The difference is, these people actually want to be here, and if they decide they no longer want to be here, the door is wide open. They have ZERO legal obligation to go to school, and the school's already been paid, they could care less if you show up or not.

Thats pretty cool. As I've said before, I absolutely HATED high school, and junior high even more than that. I HATED the schools I went to (with the exception of like 2, which were great. I moved a lot), and i HATED everything about the experience.

Hobart seems a lot different tho. The guys there are really friendly, the teachers we've met arent even in the same league as the "teachers" at the schools I've been to, and my old vocational school never even thought of having a setup half as nice as the Hobart campus and their tools.

I'm really looking forward to it. Day one was a buzzkill, just obligatory videos and lectures, etc. We watched some safety videos in Blueprint reading about O/A cutting, which scared the sh*t out of all the students who'd never used a torch before lol.

Blueprint reading is 80% classroom, and 20% hands on.

Which I'm not that thrilled with, but it is a skill I really need to learn, and plus, the rest of the classes Im taking are flip-flopped, 85% hands on, and 15% classroom.

That I like.

School dismissed about 11:30 and I got home a little after midnight. Even tho I dont really like living in Southern Ohio, one of the perks of living here is the traffic, or lack thereof. We simply have too much open road and too few people to cause traffic backups, so I really enjoyed my drive there and back.

Im looking forward to the next 9 months!! I'll post updates from time to time. I guess I just want to thank everyone who pushed me to go to some type of school. So, thanks.

Have a nice rest-of-the week everyone!!
 
Back to top
View user's profile AIM Address
Gambles
Tractor Expert


Joined: 25 Mar 2012
Posts: 1930


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:23 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This probably won't apply to you, but I've seen a lot of kids to into a vocational school with a little bit of field experience and think they know more than a 60-year old seasoned instructor. They will cop an attitude with the authority at the school and then they've got an immediate two strikes against them. Good luck with your career.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
JMOR
Tractor Guru


Joined: 13 Aug 2007
Posts: 22564


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:34 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

You probably hit on one big treason that I'm not a teacher. That being the difference in a student who is there because they want to learn & have a real interest instead of have to be where they don't want to be & have no interest! Mad
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Puddles
Tractor Expert


Joined: 02 Nov 2007
Posts: 1878


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:40 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Lanse glad your first day went well.
Are you going to stay there long enough to get into pipe welding?
As I've told you many times before, the money is in pipe welding! Or at least learn how to weld pipe. Most everywhere you go now a days they test you on pipe.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
bg/mo
Long Time User


Joined: 28 Apr 2009
Posts: 677


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:43 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Just a question , when you are done with school then what ? will you have a job straight from school? or is school to get certified?
 
Back to top
View user's profile
sflem849
Tractor Guru


Joined: 15 Jan 2007
Posts: 6198
Location: SE Wisconsin

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:43 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Sounds like everything went well. Have fun and learn a lot!

I have blueprint reading next semester on Monday nights. From what I hear it is the biggest downer of my Industrial Maint program.

I looked it up, there is a TSC in Troy. Maybe they need you! Laughing
20 S STANFIELD RD TROY OH 45373
(937) 335-6600
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Lanse
Tractor Guru


Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 4989
Location: Brookville, OH

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:14 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I AM going to school to get certified, but theres a lot of other things I need to learn too. Gonna try to find a job when I get out. The teachers say it should be easy, and everyone talks about the shortage of weldors.

But to be fair, any school will tell you that. So, I'll just gonna try it and hope for the best Smile
 
Back to top
View user's profile AIM Address
Lanse
Tractor Guru


Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 4989
Location: Brookville, OH

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:15 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Thanks Puddles!

YES!! Im there for the 9 month comprehensive course. The 5
month course is just structural welding, but you can take an
optional 9 month course that INCLUDES 4 months of pipe
welding.

Which I've chosen to. I figure its only 4 months, and if I don't do
it, I might kick myself for as long as I live.

But, YOU were probably the single biggest reason why I did, its
all you talk about :P

Thanks!! Smile
 
Back to top
View user's profile AIM Address
Puddles
Tractor Expert


Joined: 02 Nov 2007
Posts: 1878


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:18 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I keep reading where they are begging for weldors in the oil patch, (Northern Mid West). So much work there for skilled labor, but not enough housing for everybody.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Puddles
Tractor Expert


Joined: 02 Nov 2007
Posts: 1878


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:21 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Lanse wrote:
(quoted from post at 11:15:44 11/27/12)YES!! Im there for the 9 month comprehensive course. The 5
month course is just structural welding, but you can take an
optional 9 month course that INCLUDES 4 months of pipe
welding.

Which I've chosen to. I figure its only 4 months, and if I don't do
it, I might kick myself for as long as I live.

But, YOU were probably the single biggest reason why I did, its
all you talk about Razz

Thanks!! Smile


Good boy, I just knew you are a smart kid! Wink
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Lanse
Tractor Guru


Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 4989
Location: Brookville, OH

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:40 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Yeah, I know, thats what I keep hearing too.

Thing is, that I REALLY wanna go to Texas. I love it there, its where I
want to live.

That being said, if the money's up north, I could live in a camper for
a year or two and save my pennies!! Smile
 
Back to top
View user's profile AIM Address
Puddles
Tractor Expert


Joined: 02 Nov 2007
Posts: 1878


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 10:51 am    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

In my younger days I always tried to hit the shut downs, work as many hours as I could stand. In the early 80s I worked 7/12s in Alaska for awhile, made $3,050.00 a week. Living in a camp, making that kind of money doesn't take long to get money up'd.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying you have to follow the pipe trades, just learn how to weld pipe. Nothing short of at least knowing how to pass a 6-G, and 5-G open root pipe test with SMAW, and GTAW. Then you'll be head and shoulders above the rest! Wink
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Oliver 1655
Guest






Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:18 pm    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Lanse, take that busted vise with you--(ask permission of course) Have the best and brightest help you you figure it out. Nothing beats real world situations and solutions. it would be interesting what the engineers would come up with. I did that with my welding school and an old busted chisel plow.
 
Back to top
Billy NY
Tractor Guru


Joined: 05 Mar 2009
Posts: 7142
Location: NY

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:38 pm    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Lanse, great pictorial view and narrative of your current affairs! It sounds like you are pleased with the course you have planned out and are now actually navigating LOL ! Thats a good thing at your age, because before you know it, those school days will pass. High for some is tolerable or enjoyable, for others as you describe, but it was a necessity, and you completed it. I will agree, college or vocation of choice is much more palatable!

More specifically, though blueprint reading may appear to be mundane, it is an absolute requirement to master in many ways, for you most likely its fabrication. I would embrace it and master it, very important to be "fluent" or "literate" in reading blueprints. I could go on a long time about it, but in short, obviously plans/blueprints describe/illustrate in more than sufficient detail to fabricate, construct or build something, maintaining a constant for all involved, so they work from the same plans, and build as detailed. One of the key elements of performing this task is checking dimensions, "COORDINATION" of dimensions, details and so on. It would be desirable for one to learn how to methodically look at plans and check for errors, mis-coordination (no such word LOL)and be able to bring that to the attention of superiors before costly mistakes are made. This skill is invaluable and transferable to many other trades, disciplines, and management, which adds to your inventory of marketable/transferable skills, it one that contributes to your versatility, or so I firmly believe.

I'll give you a case and point, construction mind you but nonetheless, its all the same in theory and reality, just different materials, construction and methodology.

I was a project manager on a new small 9 story residential building in Manhattan, the building was constructed of structural steel, reinforced masonry, reinforced concrete and precast concrete plank for the floors. At the onset of the project, bid packages are arranged and sent out to prospective bidders, design documents like blueprints/building plans etc. Bids are eventually awarded, once that was the case for the precast supplier, the first question out of my mouth is when can I expect shop drawings, (their take on what they need to fabricate, based on design documents). They are to submit these shop drawings for approval by the architect/structural engineer of record as well as any mechanical designer to be sure all designers approve. Once approved, they are returned to the supplier, released for fabrication, by people like yourself, in this case a precast concrete plant. Same goes for structural steel, they refer to shop drawings or the task of doing so as detailing, very important these shop drawings are coordinated, dimensions correct and so on.

Fast forward to the 9th floor, I have a 250 ton crane set up on 9th ave, with a 5 hour restricted window to erect a 100'x 100' deck, 19,000lb picks on average, city of new york dot would only allow this much time to close a lane. Very tight, no room for errors at all. We go to erect several pieces of full plank, as they are raised, it becomes plainly obvious that one end of the plank has no bearing wall, steel or anything, hanging in the breeze. The engineer of record, missed this detail, architect may not be looking at the structural aspect unless it effects something architecturally. The submitted shop drawings were not reviewed systematically, completely by a competent engineer, (honestly, the man was a jerk). It got past me, as I am an expert at this, but was far too busy to do it and relied on the designers, rightfully so. So now I have to stage the pieces where the building can take the load, call the precast outfit and coordinate a detail for bearing with this jerk of an engineer, get that all calculated, checked out, approved, bring the crane and erecting crew back for an extra erecting phase, ALL at additional cost, when said and done, over 20K. Things happen, but it really pays to root these things out before action is taken, work executed etc. Nowadays C.A.D. and all the 3D modeling and similar software makes it easier to review and look into a set of plans, very important function in so many areas of industry, thought I would share that to portray an example of how critical it can be to master or at least be good at reading plans, might impress a boss, customer or what have you and the best source of this information is always or most likely a field person performing the work or say a detail orientated super whom was doing the work at one time. Its actually very satisfying to catch mistakes before they happen, and is why a person whom is good at reading plans can be extremely valuable on complicated projects or fabrication jobs.

Good Luck with all that you are doing, your posts are always a lot of fun to read and watch !
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Dick2
Tractor Guru


Joined: 11 Oct 2002
Posts: 15584


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 2:59 pm    Post subject: Re: My First Day At Hobart Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I know people are living in campers in ND, but I sure wouldn't want to live in the winter time up there. The areas where the oil wells are being drilled are in the coldest part of the state - but the money is great, so go for it if that is what you want.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic    Yesterday's Tractors Forum Index -> Tool Talk All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  

TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). Expedited shipping available, just call! Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors. Compare our super low shipping rates! We have the parts you need to repair your tractor. We are a company you can trust and have generous return policies. Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651. [ About Us ]

YT Home  |  Forums

Modern View Forum powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters