Plastic bale twine

sleepy1

Member
Going to switch to plastic twine , natural twine has become so inconsistent, what are the difference thicknesses does it go by color. The local feed store only sell the red is that the thinnest?
 
Going to switch to plastic twine , natural twine has become so inconsistent, what are the difference thicknesses does it go by color. The local feed store only sell the red is that the thinnest?
Just make sure whatever baler your running it on can use it. My NH 273 small square IIR says natural sisal only.....
 
Going to switch to plastic twine , natural twine has become so inconsistent, what are the difference thicknesses does it go by color. The local feed store only sell the red is that the thinnest?
What baler you using? May have to change billhooks (jd baler). Others usually too.
Color does not usually go with thickness. More feet per bale of twine is smaller diameter and less strength. Watch out for knot strength. More is stronger.
 
NH and Deere balers both used (and still use) Rasspe knotters. You can get different billhooks for those knotters for plastic vs. sisal twine. But you can usually make either hook work. The hooks intended for sisal have a slightly shorter knub at the end of the hook, because sisal isn't as slippery as plastic and is more likely to hang up on the knub.

I wouldn't worry about changing the bill hooks - most of the time you can make either work. But you do have to make sure everything's adjusted properly and not worn. Sisal is a lot more forgiving on sloppy, worn, or misadjusted knotters.

Make sure your bill hook pressure is good as per the manual (a nut adjusts spring tension on the pivoting jaws), make sure your knives are sharp, and above all make sure your stripper arm is adjusted so it just scrubs the bill hook. Plastic being more slippery (and often a little thinner) is a lot more prone to hang up on the hook if the wiper has a little too much clearance. Usually if there's a problem when switching from sisal to plastic it's the wiper arm not scrubbing the billhook close enough and thus not pushing the twine off the hook.

As far as thicknesses and colour, it's a similar system to sisal: There's no universal rule for colour. It's the number that indicates how many feet are in a standard-sized ball. A ball of 9000 plastic only has 9000 feet per ball, but a ball of 16,000 has 16,000 feet per ball. Because the balls are the same overall dimensions that means the 9000 is a lot thicker. For square baling, you probably want something in the 7200-11,000 range. 9000 is the most common around here, but exactly what sizes are available seems to vary regionally.
 
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Going to switch to plastic twine , natural twine has become so inconsistent, what are the difference thicknesses does it go by color. The local feed store only sell the red is that the thinnest?
Depends on what baler you have. On many you need to switch bill hooks if going to plastic twine BTDT back in the day when I still did small square bales. As a BACK up I still have a square baler but it has sat for years with out being used so if I did need it it would take work to get it back up and working
 
The 20,000 is round baler twine the others are usually used for square bales and for the big square bales it looks like 1/4 rope it's so big.
 
I use something called Balecord 6,500 ft. at 210 knot strength. Works good. About the same price as 7200 sisal. So unfortunately I am not saving any money on it.
 
I haven't used that stinking crap in 25 years and I'm still pulling it up out of the ground. Cockroaches will be extinct before it goes away.
Same hear rr. Farm I rented hadn't used plastic for I bet 40 yrs. Still snag it and it looks like the day it was taken off the bale.
 
Going to switch to plastic twine , natural twine has become so inconsistent, what are the difference thicknesses does it go by color. The local feed store only sell the red is that the thinnest?
Doesn't go by color. It used to go by "feet per bale" but now much of it goes by knot strength.

For a small square baler common twine would be 7200ft and 9000ft. 9000ft is 130lb knot strength usually. 7200ft is 170lb knot strength usually.

When dad got the New Holland baler he found that 7200/170 twine worked almost flawlessly.
 

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