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Combine purchasing time


 
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ChampagneNBeer
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Joined: 05 Jul 2020
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2021 2:23 pm    Post subject: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Hi All,

Last year I asked advice on purchasing a
combine and received many great responses.

I decided to hold off, per those responses
to learn a little more about what I was
looking to accomplish and am back, ready
for round 2.

Anywho, as it stands, I am looking to work
soybeans, oats, wheat and corn.

Acreage is small and growing to a total of
about 100 acres total when all is said and
done - likely 3-5 years down the road.

Would like to keep things simple and a
Gleaner K2 or F2 seems appropriate, but
likely not as a now purchase.

Have a line on an all crop 60, while small,
seems sufficient for this and likely the
next 2 years as things develop on the farm.

Long story long - my questions are:

Instead of needing corn heads, can I swath
corn and just pickup like a soybean with a
Gleaner k/f or ac 60?

Does the ac 60 need many changes in parts
to make it adaptable between soybeans,
corn, wheat and oats?

Same question for the Gleaner - aside from
heads? Or can you even get away with a
grain head or pick-up and do it all?

Lastly, anyone see it worth getting
something the AC 60 now and then a Gleaner
down to road, or just get the Gleaner and
be done?

Thanks,

CnB
 
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rrlund
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Joined: 21 Dec 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2021 4:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Let's address the 60 first. Some of those are 80 years old. They have canvases. If they're bad, I suppose somebody might make them in Amish country or something, but the price of them, and the chance that some very expensive belts will be rotten, the 60 would be a total non starter for me.

That brings me to the swathing. I guess it's a regional thing, but no, you absolutely can not swath corn. As far as swathing soybeans, I never heard of it anywhere. They pull and windrow dry edible beans, not soys. If you're going to move up to a Gleaner, skip the expensive mistake with the 60 and just buy one. Unless you live somewhere that everybody swaths, forget about it. Cut straight. You'll have to have both a grain head and a corn head.

There are belts and pulleys to change the cylinder speed for different crops, well, one belt and one pulley, but different sizes. I think I have three belts and three pulleys for my K2. Simple to change. Also, if you want to run soys, there's a screen that goes in in place of a sieve. Just check with the seller and see if he has all of that stuff and don't leave it behind.
 
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ChampagneNBeer
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2021 4:58 pm    Post subject: Re: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Hi rrlund,

That is kinda what I was thinking as well.

So will pass on the 60.

For Gleaner's and models - with 100 acres being my likely top end for a while, I didn't see the need to go beyond an F2, just find a good condition K/K2, F/F2.

Is it correct the original K did not have a rock trap?

Any thoughts between those 4 models?

Reason to go bigger/newer?

I want to keep things simple, easy for me to fix and have good parts availability.

For windrowing, just like that system over direct cut as I see benefits in dry down and cleaning as well as liking drapers over augers - trying to figure out if there was some way I could do all together: soybeans with pickup, windrow grains and sneak by with some pickup for corn, similar to old canvas sickle machines.
 
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rrlund
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2021 5:11 pm    Post subject: Re: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'd never heard that the Ks didn't have a rock door. My K2 does. It's not really a trap in the sense of the word as other brands have traps, it kicks a door open under the cylinder and you have to get off and close and latch it. For what you want to do though, no, I wouldn't even think of going bigger than an F series. The only basic difference between and F and a K is the width. The K has 3 straw walkers, the F has 4. Belts, pulleys, chains, sprockets, bearings are all common between the two.
 
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centash
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Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Posts: 7009
Location: southern ontario canada

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:44 am    Post subject: Re: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'll second everything Randy has said....but you might discover an F2 easier to find than a K series, simply because more were built, and as a result, more heads are available as well. You will need a corn head to harvest corn ,no way around that. A 3 row 30 inch or 36 inch on a
K makes a very good combination, 2 rows were only available in wide row or 36 inch configuration. An F series will handle a 3 or 4 row in either row width.
For small grains, a rigid header will do fine, on those a pick up attachment to the header can be used for swathed crops.
For soya, a flex head with a floating cutterbar is ideal, various types of these are around, and you could get away without the automatic header height control on small acerages.
Cylinder speed has a wide range of several hundred rpm, for lower speeds, under 500 rpm, you may have to change drive pulleys as Randy said.

When you purchase a header, make sure it includes all the drives for that model of combine, and any associated screens or equipment needed to harvest it's crop.

Good luck and have fun, they are a good machine, easy to set, operate, and repair.

Ben
 
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Timmycornpicker
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 11:17 am    Post subject: Re: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

K had the rock door, just like the EIII and E that came before it.
 
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Timmycornpicker
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 11:23 am    Post subject: Re: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If a bigger combine appears on your radar that's in good shape for a good price, buy it. Just because it's meant for 400 acres doesn't mean you have to do 400 acres. With old machines it's more about how good their condition is. Back east, an F3 will often sell for as much or more than an M3 or L3 in the same condition. Now if you can't fit something bigger than an F series combine down a road or through a bridge, that's a different story. I have a K2 that I keep patched up for 30 or so acres of small grain that will go down a road that nobody else can get through with their bigger, newer combines even with the heads off.
 
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DeltaSteve
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2021 6:03 am    Post subject: Re: Combine purchasing time Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Forget about the 60,or any of the old small pull types. Very few,if any parts are still available.Wiuth their small 20 bushel grain tank and short unloading auger that will only reach into a pickup truck,they simply dont make sence unless you are into small plots,or are Amish. The Gleaners,or an IH Axial flow would be a fine machine. I would not consider a JD xx00/xx20 eries because they seem to be overly complicated with way too many moveing parts,even though they are good popular machines.A 4 row corn head would serve well for 100 acres,but norhing wrong with 6 rows either.Really,trying to harvest corn without a cornhead is futile,justwont work.Best to cut grain standing if you are in an area that allows it.If not,then you have to swath. Acctually thats not a bad thing. You tend to get a cleaner sample due to all the green stuff being dried up.Downside to that is slightly higher harvest loss,and unexpected heavy rains can damage crop.Swathing is how I prefer to harvest oats.Since I no longer grow oats for grain,not an issue.I run a 1965 JohnDeere 95 with 4 row corn and 16' heads. New,NO! But perfectly adequet for my needs. Back in the day when I grew over 100 acres of corn,it did the job well. My biggest issue then(and now) is lack of adequet trucks to haul it away. One little 12 single axle grain truck just doesnt cut it. So an adequet grain truck is also an important consideration.You cant haul your crop away without an adequet grain truck. Good luck.
 
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