Yesterday's Tractor Co.
Shop Now View Cart
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 9N,2N,8N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   Traditional YT Forum ViewClassic View   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile    Log inLog in 

Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way

Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

 
Post new topic    
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
studebakerjim
Regular


Joined: 10 May 2011
Posts: 28


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:05 am    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Thank You Tds! I appreciate it!!
 
Back to top
View user's profile
GreenEnvy
Long Time User


Joined: 08 Oct 2012
Posts: 1393


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:30 am    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

My great grandpa used to farm 2 1/2 quarters with some in pasture with nothing but horses. Now people think you need 9500 and 200 hp tractor to do that. Funny how times have changed.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
1206SWMO
Tractor Guru


Joined: 14 Dec 2007
Posts: 4373


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 4:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

The same here..In the 1960's-70's the county that I live in was the leading milo producing
county in the state of Missouri..Now I doubt that theres 500 acres in the entire county...
Its all gone to corn which often yields 50-75 bushels more per acre...
 
Back to top
View user's profile
1206SWMO
Tractor Guru


Joined: 14 Dec 2007
Posts: 4373


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:24 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

In the 1930's Dad and Grandpa farmed 1800 acres in central Kansas...400 acres was tillable
and 1400 acres was in pasture..In 1929 a new 22-36 McCormick tractor replaced the horses
as all the boys had left home except for Dad...The 22-36 was used until 1939 when a new M
Farmall replaced it..Dad was down to 320 acres then as Grandpa had passed and Grandma
sold off lots of it..

In the 1950's Dad farmed 200 acres in MO with a 8N Ford,a 2 row planter,and a 6 ft combine...
The tractor was used almost every day of the year and had to be overhauled every 2 years..

I had an uncle at Caldwell Kansas whom in the 1930s'-1950's farmed 480 acres of wheat with a 22-36
McCormick and a 12 ft pull type IH combine...He used this until 1963 when he retired..

Several familes farmed 300-400 acres with a M and a H Farmall tractors as there only tractors..
Another family farmed 640 acres (not all tillable) for a couple of years with a new Super H Farmall..
There were several boys and it was run 24 hours a day only being shut off to fuel or change oil..
The ground was worked at night and the crops planted between dawn and dusk..They finally were
able to buy a M Farmall to help the Super H..This family was about 20 miles away and I thought that
this was just a wild story until a couple of their neighbors told me it was true..They said that this was
one working family..They had to hire some of the harvesting done..


In the early 1960's a neighbor farmed 960 acres with a Super 88 Oliver diesel and a 400 Case diesel...
They had a 4 row planter and a 12 ft combine...There were 2 boys at home and the tractors were run
well in to the night..They finally got a new 1850 Oliver in 1964..Another family had two 88 Olivers on
800 acres..Another neighbor farmed 320 acres with a WD-45 Allis..I could go on and on..

Yes,the times have sure changed..
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Superpicker
Regular


Joined: 30 Aug 2009
Posts: 170


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 5:36 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

When my dad starting farming in 1967, he bought a 1946 A JD with a 2 row cultivator to use at a sale. Three years later he bought a JD 60 and a MH 22 with a loader on it as he had more cattle and he needed a loader tractor for hauling manure... He didn't think he needed three tractors, so he sold the A, now as we look back, he says what was I thinking...
 
Back to top
View user's profile
casecollectorsc
Tractor Guru


Joined: 24 Dec 2011
Posts: 6013


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Good stories!! Grandpa farmed a quarter and a 80 (240 acres) with a 41 B John Deere. Had his name down for a 41 H IHC but someone else got it from the dealer instead of him so he bought the 41 B. Always said he should have waited for another H as the JD B was no way near the tractor a H was.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
AJB-830
Long Time User


Joined: 03 Oct 2010
Posts: 756
Location: NE Wisconsin

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 12:16 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I have read most of the comments others have said, so here is my input. I have a JD 4420 combine and it works fine for my 35 acres of wheat & oats I do on my 80 acre hobby farm. But for 320 acres of corn & milo, I think that would be a bit much for a 4400 or even a 6600. The biggest problem you will have going over that many acres is to keep the machine in repair. Remember these machine are over 40 years old now.

I have a good friend who combines over 300 acres of wheat, soybeans, and corn with his JD 4420. But he has several break-downs every year. It's only because we have good mechanic that worked on combines for a JD dealer that he can keep his combine running. And he also has a JD 4400 combine that he uses for parts. But his 4420 has over 5,000 hours. I tell him it's time to move up to a newer combine but he says the 4420 is his last combine as he is 75 years old.

Now if you can find a 4400, 4420, or 6600 with less than 2500 hours, then maybe repairs won't be that much of an issue. I bought my 4420 7 years ago with 2800 hours from my local JD dealer and I had them go totally through it. They replaced a lot of belts and other parts. So far I have had no problems with it in 7 years, but then I have only put about 125 hours on it. What ever you buy, I would make sure you have someone with a very good knowledge of JD combines inspect it. Also, a 4400 or 4420 can only handle a 4-row corn head so that would limit you to a 4-row planter.

If I was trying to combine 300+ acres, I would probably be looking at a 9500 or 9510 with low hours. But since you are just beginning to farm again, that may not be possible. I just hobby farm so I don't have to worry about making a profit. Can't give you any advice on tractors as my newest tractor is a JD 6110R. Good luck on your new venture.
Al
 
Back to top
View user's profile
paul
Tractor Guru


Joined: 25 Dec 1997
Posts: 24686


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 1:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

By quarters, do you mean a couple of 40 acres or a couple of 160 acres? I've heard it both ways....

320 acres is a bugger to harvest these days, we get a lot bigger yields than we did 20+ years ago.

Would never get done without a 6 row combine 'here', I'm assuming you are more in hobby mode, take a few breaks in the day, have other stuff going on, mostly just you?

The 55-105 combines and the 4400 series might struggle with today's yields, if you can't fit a full round in your hopper you just made harvest a lot longer.....

I've found you need an old 8 row combine with a 6 row head to make it work out these days. Or a 6 row combine with a 4 row head.

Planting isn't so bad, but be aware of harvest issues. Handling even just 25% more grain per acre is a world of difference from the 1960s! Dad grew 80-120bu corn, I'm growing 140-220. Dad picked with a 2 row ear picker and a 12 foot bean head on a 45. I struggle to get it done alone with a 6 row and 20 foot head on a Gleaner L3, I have 33% more acres is all, but hauling way more bushels away and keeping up with.

Paul
 
Back to top
View user's profile
JMS/.MN
Tractor Guru


Joined: 05 Mar 2009
Posts: 12159


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I agree that the 4400/4420 is a pretty old combine, but a four row head does not limit you to a four row planter. Any multiple of four will work. For many years I ran a Gleaner F2 four row behind a JD 7000 eight row planter. 12 or 16 would work as well.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
AJB-830
Long Time User


Joined: 03 Oct 2010
Posts: 756
Location: NE Wisconsin

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 6:51 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

That's basically what I meant. Using a 6 row planter with a 4 row combine head means you have to be very careful to keep your row spacing accurate with each pass. Had a neighbor who ran a 6-row planter with a 4-row head on his 6620 combine one year. The next year he updated to a 6-row combine head. Al
 
Back to top
View user's profile
notjustair
Tractor Guru


Joined: 07 Jun 2010
Posts: 5785
Location: NE Kansas

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I work hard to make a living on 1032 acres of milo, oats, wheat, and beans as well as about 125 head of cattle. My grandparents farmed two 80's and lived very well and died with more money than I will ever have. Of course, I put about $35k into the 9500 combine this year. Probably stupid, but it's been here since it was a year old and it may very well see me to retirement. I do have a tractor from the 90's, but I also use an old 8430 for tillage. I'm too big to stay small but too conservative to jump into things like auto steer and combine lease payments.

Milo is a great crop if you have animals to feed it to. It isn't worth squat. I grind equal parts oats and milo with alfalfa thrown in the grinder for "ice cream" for the cattle. They do well on it. The last time I did well farming milo to sell I had a hog farm in Arkansas truck it down there but I had to bin 10k bushels of it and spend the winter loading semis. It's a headache because of it's higher yield (need truck drivers or cart men) and you don't make much. It's easy on a combine, though.

I've about decided I'm not changing the plates on the 12 row 1760 planter for milo any more. It's just too much work when I end up planting beans and milo about the same time - literally a day apart some years. I'll just use block off plates in the 750 drill. Grandpa drilled milo with a steel wheel drill and no block off plates, but I'm not looking to raise a thicket.

I farm nearly exclusively with green equipment but that's only due to dealer support. I grew up diehard red (and still use three red tractors around here - some daily). The green stuff is expensive to repair, expensive to buy, and breaks down as much as any other. It holds its value, though. I would never be afraid of a good IH 1440 (or the like) combine. My uncle's sold at auction a year ago dirt cheap and I should have bought it as a backup. I chickened out because of the hauling and I have kicked myself ever since. The old machines do just as good a job or better. I'm convinced the best samples I have ever seen came from our Massey super 92 combine in he early 80's.

If you have the time to spare, don't you dare be afraid to farm with smaller, older machines. Keep them in good repair and you will reap the benefits of low overhead. Sure I love my new 12 row planter with vacuum and liquid fertilizer, but I paid on it for four years. I have more fun hauling a load of grain to town in the 54 Chevy 6400 than I do in the semis that cost me taxes out the nose. When I retire I'll farm a few hundred acres and use my old machines. Then it really will be only for love. I'm envious - enjoy!
 
Back to top
View user's profile
caterpillar guy
Tractor Guru


Joined: 24 Jun 2007
Posts: 3671


Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 7:32 am    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

If you can afford to, up grade your thinking to a 4020 or newer and combines the same way. Your not any younger and your body will thank you for that decision. Some of the comforts will go a long way to how you feel at the end of the day and the next morning when you wake up.
 
Back to top
View user's profile
1923 Gleaner
Regular


Joined: 13 Apr 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Kansas: The Wheat State

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:29 am    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

It never ceases to amaze me this "romance" people have with farming. I have city relatives who are only a couple generations from the farm and say "oh if only I had the chance to farm". I tell them "well your Dad sure wanted his money for his share of the land fast, if you want to farm that bad they sell a farm somewhere in the state everyday go buy one". I am 57 years old, grew up here, and have yet to find this romance. I am so glad I am closer to the end of life than the beginning. Between city people voting for higher property taxes and gas lines and power lines using eminent domain to do what they want on land you paid for and pay taxes on, crop prices the same they were 40 years ago yet machinery constantly going higher I am looking forward to the grave. I guess I should have gotten a factory union job out of high school and had the yearly raise and a package with paid health care then now I would want to "farm".

I will be interested to hear how you can pay living expenses with this great income you will be getting on this 320 acres. Are you making land payments or crop share on this 320? I would like to know what is backing you that is allowing you to fulfill this fantasy?

Yes I am ranting but it really pisses me off to constantly have an outsider tell me how great this life is. I want to see city people go back to wages of 40 years ago with todays expenses and "romance" about that!!!!!!
 
Back to top
View user's profile
mudcreek183
Long Time User


Joined: 03 Oct 2011
Posts: 521
Location: Morrison Tn.

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 12:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

1923 Gleaner wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:29:39 01/14/1Cool It never ceases to amaze me this "romance" people have with farming. I have city relatives who are only a couple generations from the farm and say "oh if only I had the chance to farm". I tell them "well your Dad sure wanted his money for his share of the land fast, if you want to farm that bad they sell a farm somewhere in the state everyday go buy one". I am 57 years old, grew up here, and have yet to find this romance. I am so glad I am closer to the end of life than the beginning. Between city people voting for higher property taxes and gas lines and power lines using eminent domain to do what they want on land you paid for and pay taxes on, crop prices the same they were 40 years ago yet machinery constantly going higher I am looking forward to the grave. I guess I should have gotten a factory union job out of high school and had the yearly raise and a package with paid health care then now I would want to "farm".

I will be interested to hear how you can pay living expenses with this great income you will be getting on this 320 acres. Are you making land payments or crop share on this 320? I would like to know what is backing you that is allowing you to fulfill this fantasy?

Yes I am ranting but it really pisses me off to constantly have an outsider tell me how great this life is. I want to see city people go back to wages of 40 years ago with todays expenses and "romance" about that!!!!!!



What he said
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Dugger
Long Time User


Joined: 04 Oct 2014
Posts: 594
Location: East central Illinois

Report to Moderator

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 12:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Getting back into the Farming Life the old fashion way Reply to specific post Reply with quote

[quote="1923 Gleaner"](reply to post at 12:29:39 01/14/18) [/quote]

Amen 1923 gleaner
 
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic    Yesterday's Tractors Forum Index -> Combines and Harvesters All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 2 of 5

 
Jump to:  

TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). Expedited shipping available, just call! Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors. Compare our super low shipping rates! We have the parts you need to repair your tractor. We are a company you can trust and have generous return policies. Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651. [ About Us ]

YT Home  |  Forums

Modern View Forum powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters