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City boy question


 
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gregww
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Joined: 15 May 2017
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Location: N.W. Illinois

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 3:12 pm    Post subject: City boy question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I asked a farmer this once, and he could not tell me. Anyway, sitting here eating a canned Chinese dinner. I know yum yum. It has those little bitty ears of corn in it. Where do they get these little ears of corn? Do they simply pick corn when it is very very young? I know you can grow cherry tomatoes. They are small. Is there a special variety of corn that is very small?
 
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fixerupper
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Joined: 12 Oct 2003
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Location: Albert City Iowa

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 3:29 pm    Post subject: Re: City boy question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Must be some kind of special corn. The regular corn we know grows a long cob before the kernals form.
 
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jeffcat
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 3:39 pm    Post subject: Re: City boy question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

A lot of that I have seen in the Chinese kitchens is sweet corn. In the canning
process they come from the ears of regular corn. You see ears of corn now and
then that have that little minny ear growing up the side like a dew claw. I
would assume most is just very young corn harvested really early in growth. You
want to plant some?

 
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Adirondack case guy
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 4:00 pm    Post subject: Re: City boy question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

According to my Google search Baby corn is the secondary ears harvested before development when the silk
barely shows from the secondary ears. It has to be hand picked at the proper time. The primary ear can be
left to mature to common size.
Loren
 
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gregww
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Location: N.W. Illinois

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 4:04 pm    Post subject: Re: City boy question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Seems very labor intensive for what it is.
 
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Crazy Horse
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 2:01 pm    Post subject: Re: City boy question Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Maybe this is the info you read about ACG .... from Wikipedia .... I must say that this info surprises me. Nowadays with all sorts of small fruit and veggies actually being their own variety (tiny tomatoes, tiny potatoes, etc), you'd think there would be a tiny corn plant.

Baby corn (also known as young corn, cornlets or baby sweetcorn) is a cereal grain taken from corn (maize) harvested early while the stalks are still small and immature. It typically is eaten whole ? cob included ? in contrast to mature corn, whose cob is too tough for human consumption. It is eaten both raw and cooked. Baby corn is common in stir fry dishes.

Production methods - There are two methods for producing baby corn either as a primary crop or as a secondary crop in a planting of sweet corn or field corn. In the first method, a seed variety is chosen and planted to produce only baby corn. Many varieties are suitable, but those developed specifically for baby corn tend to produce more ears per plant. In the second production method, the variety is selected to produce sweet or field corn. The second ear from the top of the plant is harvested for baby corn, while the top ear is allowed to mature.

Baby corn ears are hand-picked as soon as the corn silks emerge from the ear tips, or a few days after. Corn generally matures very quickly, so the harvest of baby corn must be timed carefully to avoid ending up with more mature corn ears. Baby corn ears are typically 4.5 to 10 cm (1.8?3.9 in) in length and 0.7 to 1.7 cm (0.28?0.67 in) in diameter.

Uses - Baby corn is consumed worldwide.[3] Its production has increased from 239.7 to 279.7 million tonnes from 2003 to 2013.

Baby corn forage can also be fed fresh or ensilaged to livestock animals.
 
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