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Old girl's still got it

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Fatjay
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:30 pm    Post subject: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Needed to take up a bit of concrete. Was planning on jack hammer's and pry bar's. Decided to see if my oliver 77 was up to the task and sure enough, ran better than it has in years. Every time the engine even thought about bogging the governor kicked in and it roared back to life.

I did sheer a pin in the hydraulic pump drive but 47 cents at the hardware store and 20 minutes later a new one was in and back at it.

It was running so well, I decided to call the excavator and cancel him digging my new garage. Bought a 24" backhoe bucket, and I'll be digging the footer myself.














 
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SVcummins
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 9:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Just be careful the YT corps of engineers doesn?t
get you
 
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Bruce from Can.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:34 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

With nice equipment like that, you are an
excavating company. Does give me the shivers
looking at a skid steer without a cage. I don?t want
to be a harpy, just over the past three decades, I
have been glad to have had a cage. Once while
getting bales out of the bale barn, I took a bale from
the top row , stacked 3 high. Backed away and
turned, all good. Then just as I started moving
away, another top row bale came down square on
top of the skid steer, it had been leaning on the bale
I removed I guess. Without the cage, I would have
been a dead man
 
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Geo-TH,In
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:48 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'm always amazed how much breaking force hydraulics has on the back hook.

Try picking up something heavy with the back bucked, lift it up high and drop it on the concrete.

Have fun.
geo
 
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Geo-TH,In
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:50 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

SV,
You are right there's a lot of arm chair engineers.
geo
 
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BarnyardEngineering
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:13 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Unless an airplane drops from the sky, he's pretty safe on that Bobcat considering where and how he is using it.
 
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larry@stinescorner
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:20 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

great pictures!!!!
 
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:28 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote


The worst danger in that skid steer is the lack of side screens. I'll bet that it has been 45 years since insurance companies refused to cover them for comp claims. Too many guys lost their arms.
 
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Fatjay
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:51 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Common sense says keep your arms inside the machine until it comes to a complete stop.

The biggest hazard that I'm worried about with that bobcat is flipping backwards. Without the bucket on the front just moving handles forward lifts the front wheels up. I installed wheelie bars for that reason, went to about 45 degree's back and scared myself pretty well.
 
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Thomasthetankengine
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:16 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Bobcat looks relatively new. First time on one was in 1976.
No cage on it because we were cleaning out hen houses.
Hydraulics were herky jerky. It was fine on smooth surfaces
but on rough ground it was a rodeo.
 
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:20 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Fatjay wrote:
(quoted from post at 06:51:01 01/14/20)
Common sense says keep your arms inside the machine until it comes to a complete stop.

The biggest hazard that I'm worried about with that bobcat is flipping backwards. Without the bucket on the front just moving handles forward lifts the front wheels up. I installed wheelie bars for that reason, went to about 45 degree's back and scared myself pretty well.



A lot of guys that were thought to have common sense got hurt badly. That is why they started putting the guards in. You will probably be OK if you keep it slow, low, on strictly level ground with an experienced operator only. Although it is unlikely that an experienced operator will get on it.


The frequent failure of relying on common sense is why OSHA was formed 50 years ago. It was determined that just asking a guy if he had common sense wasn't cutting it.
 
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Billy NY
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:15 am    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'm surprised you even questioned the capability of the Oliver 77, aside from maybe how it was running at the time you needed the work to get done, certainly is big enough a machine to work up the sections of broken concrete. You must have broke the slab down with the electric jackhammer 1st. Or did it break once you got the bucket teeth under with leverage ? Sure beats hand labor.
The 24" bucket, did you luck on where the pins connect, was it from the same model hoe or did you have to modify to get it to fit ?
One thing I do like about my hoe is a mechanical thumb, makes it useful and they look fairly easy to build by anyone who can fabricate with steel.

I too would be real cautious on the skid steer. I do know of someone killed when operating one, but it was when he got out with the bucket raised, got caught on the controls or something, I used to deliver to their shop. Was not of the era of yours, but without some of the common safety features we have now. Be great if you could add protection, but if not, just have to use lots of care as alternatives to that could be final
 
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Fatjay
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CVPost-Billy NY wrote:
(quoted from post at 14:15:28 01/14/20) I'm surprised you even questioned the capability of the Oliver 77, aside from maybe how it was running at the time you needed the work to get done, certainly is big enough a machine to work up the sections of broken concrete. You must have broke the slab down with the electric jackhammer 1st. Or did it break once you got the bucket teeth under with leverage ? Sure beats hand labor.
The 24" bucket, did you luck on where the pins connect, was it from the same model hoe or did you have to modify to get it to fit ?
One thing I do like about my hoe is a mechanical thumb, makes it useful and they look fairly easy to build by anyone who can fabricate with steel.

I too would be real cautious on the skid steer. I do know of someone killed when operating one, but it was when he got out with the bucket raised, got caught on the controls or something, I used to deliver to their shop. Was not of the era of yours, but without some of the common safety features we have now. Be great if you could add protection, but if not, just have to use lots of care as alternatives to that could be final


I just replaced all the concrete around my pool over the summer, since I was working in close proximity to the pool I wanted something that wouldn't damage it, thus the electric jack hammer. It worked really well too. Mixed about 300 bags of new concrete with my harbor freight mixer. So I was a bit used to breaking it by hand.

The end where I started hte concrete was an inch thick. The end where I ended it was 12" thick. it went down hill a bit and I guess they just filled it with more concrete. I started breaking it with the jack hammer then moving it with the backhoe, by the end i was just lifting the slabs with the hoe. I'd forgotten how much of a beast that thing is, and it's running better than it has in a long time. 3-4 years ago I did some stuff for my father over at his house and it just sat out back until a guy wanted to buy it. I got it started and running well, then he offered me $1500 and I told him to pound sand.

The bucket is off a case 580, I did have to modify it a bit. The ears on the lower part of the bucket were to narrow so I had to shave about 1/4", that was a bit of a nightmare. But the distance between top and bottom ears is 12-13" on both buckets so the geometry is about the same. I can't curl the bucket all the way though because it gets in the way of itself, so unless i cut a chunk of the bucket out I won't be able to pin stuff between the bucket and the boom. When I was moving that concrete I wished I had a thumb, would have made life a lot easier.

My Rule #1 is never, ever go under anything that is supported by hydraulics, especially when the hoses are 50 years old. Bobcat, backhoe, FEL, anything hydraulic. Set it down first, then get off. Just like jacking a car up, it's hydraulic, don't go under it. I've heard plenty of stories on how people have been killed or seriously injured by it and I'm not interested in becoming one of those people. I would never stick my arms out when the bobcat arms are up. Just thinking about it makes my hairs stand up. Few years back I was moving dirt with my ferguson TO30 FEL and the bucket got up to about 5' and wouldn't raise any more. I shut it down and got off to go look at the pump on hte front, and I didn't go under because of the paranoia. Just then a hose blew and the bucket dropped to the ground and I thought if i'd have been dumb enough to get a closer look at the pump, i might be dead. Hydraulics are something I don't mess around with.
 
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Fatjay wrote:
(quoted from post at 15:15:33 01/14/20)
CVPost-Billy NY wrote:
(quoted from post at 14:15:28 01/14/20) I'm surprised you even questioned the capability of the Oliver 77, aside from maybe how it was running at the time you needed the work to get done, certainly is big enough a machine to work up the sections of broken concrete. You must have broke the slab down with the electric jackhammer 1st. Or did it break once you got the bucket teeth under with leverage ? Sure beats hand labor.
The 24" bucket, did you luck on where the pins connect, was it from the same model hoe or did you have to modify to get it to fit ?
One thing I do like about my hoe is a mechanical thumb, makes it useful and they look fairly easy to build by anyone who can fabricate with steel.

I too would be real cautious on the skid steer. I do know of someone killed when operating one, but it was when he got out with the bucket raised, got caught on the controls or something, I used to deliver to their shop. Was not of the era of yours, but without some of the common safety features we have now. Be great if you could add protection, but if not, just have to use lots of care as alternatives to that could be final


I just replaced all the concrete around my pool over the summer, since I was working in close proximity to the pool I wanted something that wouldn't damage it, thus the electric jack hammer. It worked really well too. Mixed about 300 bags of new concrete with my harbor freight mixer. So I was a bit used to breaking it by hand.

The end where I started hte concrete was an inch thick. The end where I ended it was 12" thick. it went down hill a bit and I guess they just filled it with more concrete. I started breaking it with the jack hammer then moving it with the backhoe, by the end i was just lifting the slabs with the hoe. I'd forgotten how much of a beast that thing is, and it's running better than it has in a long time. 3-4 years ago I did some stuff for my father over at his house and it just sat out back until a guy wanted to buy it. I got it started and running well, then he offered me $1500 and I told him to pound sand.

The bucket is off a case 580, I did have to modify it a bit. The ears on the lower part of the bucket were to narrow so I had to shave about 1/4", that was a bit of a nightmare. But the distance between top and bottom ears is 12-13" on both buckets so the geometry is about the same. I can't curl the bucket all the way though because it gets in the way of itself, so unless i cut a chunk of the bucket out I won't be able to pin stuff between the bucket and the boom. When I was moving that concrete I wished I had a thumb, would have made life a lot easier.

My Rule #1 is never, ever go under anything that is supported by hydraulics, especially when the hoses are 50 years old. Bobcat, backhoe, FEL, anything hydraulic. Set it down first, then get off. Just like jacking a car up, it's hydraulic, don't go under it. I've heard plenty of stories on how people have been killed or seriously injured by it and I'm not interested in becoming one of those people. I would never stick my arms out when the bobcat arms are up. Just thinking about it makes my hairs stand up. Few years back I was moving dirt with my ferguson TO30 FEL and the bucket got up to about 5' and wouldn't raise any more. I shut it down and got off to go look at the pump on hte front, and I didn't go under because of the paranoia. Just then a hose blew and the bucket dropped to the ground and I thought if i'd have been dumb enough to get a closer look at the pump, i might be dead. Hydraulics are something I don't mess around with.



I'll be that pretty much all of the people who ever got serious injuries or were killed by loader arms coming down on their arms said that they would never stick their arms out when the arms were up. I bet also that it wouldn't take you more than an hour to fix up a shield in there since you have those diagonal braces to attach them to.
 
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Billy NY
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:46 pm    Post subject: Re: Old girl's still got it Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Cool story working with something of the era of this backhoe and the bobcat. I see so many of these older kinds backhoes around, in various condition, some very nice too. They usually are under 5K, typically 4 stick controls too. I'd have to think even these are more robust than a modern 3pt hitch and or with subframe mount for work like you needed to do. I'd have to agree, in running condition, has to be worth double or a bit more than he offered. I waited awhile, but needed something, went for something much newer and what sold me was that it did have a very stout mechanical thumb. I see the same era models in the same price range, some seemingly really good prices too, which always happens after you bought one LOL. Mine was very low hour or should be, hard to prove, but none had the thumb so I figured what a great all around very useful kind of machine, one I've needed a long time. So far, it's been turn key, tasks or small projects can be tackled when I have time. I can't think of a more versatile machine no matter what one has, or how old and that they are bulky for tight work areas, still do a lot of work for what one pays for one.

Interesting how the geometry worked out, hard to picture, but get that it works but may not be the best fit. The thumb on mine has 3 positions and while a hydraulic thumb is really nice, I can set it to work very well, great for logs and such. It's a bear to move into the stowed position when you do not need it, it gets past you, will hurt and is a bit heavy for one person, I may find a way to use a come along or something, easy way to get seriously injured or mess up your back. Might be a better balance point but it sure is heavy, that is where the hydraulic one has a distinct advantage.

I could not agree more, and I think I recall posting about that hose failing. It happened to me with a Case W-20 loader, the arms dropped onto the side of a tandem dump truck after the hose failed, and before I tilted the bucket to dump the load of gravel. It did significant damage to the side wall of the dump body, but we did a great job of repairing it and making it look like it did. You never know when that could happen. When I use the front bucket of the backhoe to support something, I put the safety prop in place every time. If I need to adjust while working, I just hook a chain fall onto it until done. I'd rather something else gets me than my own complacency with equipment.
 
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