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While we are on the subject of grain bins....

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Dave H (MI)
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 6:27 am    Post subject: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

What are the options in older bins? Corn is the first thing I am growing because the tenant has not had it on the property in a few years. Just wheat and soy. I will likely grow these also in future years. I have most of the other equipment but really don't know much about drying and storing the crop. The bin I was looking at had a ventilated floor. My experience is with hay bales and I have to bale dry to keep the bales from heating and dusty mold from becoming a problem. IF I were to pick the corn a little on the moist side, what would I need besides this bin to get it down to an acceptable moisture level? Fans, heaters, etc? I hear about dryers but not real sure how they work...dry it and bin it or dry it IN the bin? Just trying to get a feel for how the process works so I can get everything in place. Most websites only discuss feature of new equipment which is not an option. I am assuming that field drying is not always practical.
 
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cd1
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 6:58 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

have you looked at just hauling directly to the elevator and figuring out the grain bins later. you typically need to have a decent amount of acres to make a drier pencil out and really the whole on farm storage thing as a whole. Now if you are using the grain, milling it yourself, etc. that is going to be a different story. Around here an elevator will store your grain for $0.03 per bushel per month until you want to sell. One plus to this is that they don't keep your grain separate. More or less your grain is just on paper, this takes a lot of risk out of the equation with corn spoiling, hauling twice, etc.
 
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DeltaRed
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:06 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

You do NOT want to bin 'wet' corn!Corn needs to be to 13.5% moisture to store.You need to 'field dry' it or run it through a dryer.In your humid climate I dont believe 'fanning' will be sufficent to dry.You may get by with a space heater at the air intake.Here in dry western Colorado,we dont dry anything.Its usually plenty dry at harvest(Nov/Dec).Invest in a moisture tester.Pretty cheap 'insurance'.
 
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pistons
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:07 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

The renters on the family farm pay about $300 per month when they are running the dryers on two bins. They can play that game, they have their own semi truck, farm thousands of acres. They have volume. If I were to farm the place, I would likely just haul field to elevator and be done with it.
 
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J. Schwiebert
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:12 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

How big is this bin? Does it have stir-alls? Does it has a fan on the drying floor? We have 2000 bu bin with a drying floor and a 1 Horse power fan and have not had any problem is 20% or less.
 
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DeltaRed
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:12 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

cd is right on.But the elevator still wont accept it it if its too wet to store.While 13.5% is 'storable',some elevators will accept it at 15.5%.
 
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J. Schwiebert
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:13 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

You said "Pick corn" Are you shelling or did you mean pick the corn. Ear corn in wire or wooden cribs can be almost 30% moisture.
 
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JMS/.MN
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:41 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Elevators charge drying and shrinkage for anything above 15.5%. Plus 3 cents/month for storage. That"s why we dry and store at home. Also no danger of the elevator going belly up and not have enough bonding to cover inventory. Storing at an elevator, you"re likely to be able to sell only there. Plus there is the 10-15 cent dump charge with many. And the same if you want to take it out.
 
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RodinNS
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:49 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I cut some wheat this summer that was 19-20% and they put it in an aeration bin. As far as I know they didn't have any problems with it. That said... when they know it's going in that wet they don't fill the bin. There's enough bin space there that they can spread that over a few bins, then once it stabilizes, run it back up the leg and dump it in another bin.
From what I understand, 17% is generally the safety line for most grains on air around here. Dry storage is about 13%. This is with small grains. I don't know about corn.... I would think if you were doing any volume a drier would pay you.

Rod
 
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randallinMo
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 7:56 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I understand the "outbound load out charge", but I've never heard of an "inbound" dump charge. Wow, I"d be looking for a different elevator.
 
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Dave H (MI)
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:45 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I estimate using about half my output. Would like to keep it on farm plus there is some buzz around here about going organic...lots of work but their seems to be good money in it. Anyhow, a bin like I am looking at will get me started.
 
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Dave H (MI)
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:52 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Most of the bins that come up around here are in the 5000 bushel range. This would easily allow me to keep half my output in the best year I am likely to have anytime soon. I could expand as necessary. The bins generally have a perforated floor. I don't know enough about bins yet to tell if this is a guarantee that some type of external ventilation( a fan, that is) is available or if there are bins with floors and no ventilation. I have seen bins for sale with the ability to move the grain within the bin in order to dry it more evenly. With higher prices for grain a lot of farms locally are putting in new bin systems.
 
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Dave H (MI)
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:56 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I would be running a combine and shelling almost all of the corn. A dozen rows or so I will run the old picker over it and leave it on the ear. I can sell these for wildlife feed by the bag. I also use it to feed our small flock of heavy geese. They take it right off the cob.
 
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AG in IN
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:58 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Drying bins are still around, and even popular with those that raise their own corn for livestock. They are a bit slower, but you don't cook the grain to death like most people do with a batch or continuous flow drier, test weight isn't cooked out of it either. Fan/drier combo, ventilated floor, and stir-rator are necessary for this. Extra vents and vent tubes help, too. We shoot for about 13% moisture for shelled corn kept for the hogs, and have never had any trouble with spoilage.

On warmer, low humidity days, you can drop moisture levels some just by running a fan.

AG
 


Last edited by AG in IN on Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:59 am; edited 1 time in total
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Dave H (MI)
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 9:38 am    Post subject: Re: While we are on the subject of grain bins.... Reply to specific post Reply with quote

That about hits the nail on the head, thanks! This is what I am trying to get done without knowing all the ins and outs of how to do it. I take it off the field shelled as dry as I can possibly get it. Put what I need in a bin and send the rest a few miles away to the elevator. So a bin similar to what I am looking at now (5K bushel, drying floor) is good but it needs (if I am understanding you) an external fan/dryer unit and a stir-ator to move the grain so it drys evenly...yes?
 
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