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Roto baler question?

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Destroked 450
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 5:51 pm    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote


We had both, 1st cutting we square baled and put in the barn, 2nd cutting we rolled with the rotobaler and left in the field.
In the fall we'ed turn the cows in and once they had eaten the forage we'ed go out and chop open 8-10 of those small rolls with a axe, we rolled them so tight the cows couldn't eat them until we chopped them open.
Each day go check the cows and chop open some more rolls until all where eaten in that field, then move cattle to the next field and start again. Fields that we rolled but didn't put cattle on we'd load on wagons and spread them in other fields where cattle would be later, never stored those small rolls in barns or sheds.

Dad did the adjusting on the baler but I was making bales with it and our WD Allis when I was 10, I would bale all day without the baler needing any adjustments. Safety was turning to pto off before getting off the tractor to do anything to the baler, if dad bought me off of a tractor while the pto was running I'd have trouble setting for a week.
With the pto running they were very dangerous, rotobaler took one mans arms and killed another not far from us, same baler, same farm one year apart, hired help.

Dad sold one of the farms in 70 due to health reasons and down sized the herd, didn't need the extra bales after that and quite using the rotobaler, brother sold in for scrap in the late 80's.
 
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oldtanker
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:02 am    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

CVPost-16-30 oilpull wrote:
(quoted from post at 16:28:29 11/17/1Cool Tanker, I didn't read all of your posts, but why do you think they weren't a success? You say NH had so many in one year which was less than twice rotobaler average. All can't be number one and look what happened years later.Large round bales. look how long it took for no-til or rotary combines to catch on. I don't see 75000 units being a failure. Asfar as using one goes, yes they are different. We had to rake a double wind row to get a good bale and we didn't have any trouble loading them. The straw was great to bed with. you just unrolled them. I'm not saying the were better than square ,but they worked and believe me were much better than loose hay.



LOL that was the whole reason for the post, to figure out why they were not really successful.

I pointed out 1946 for NH as it was the first year after WWII when the government allowed them to go into full production. Prior to that the NH only mad a couple of hundred a year during the war years. After all the square baler was invented until 1939 and not by NH.

The round baler was invented in 1910 or there abouts but didn't go into serious production until AC introduced the roto baler. And no, the concept of a round baler was not an AC idea.

My thoughts that the roto baler was a failure is the break in production what was it? 64 -72? The the renewed production in 72 to 74 never to make hay equipment again? That says the company though it was a bust.

75,000 may sound like a lot but when the potential customer base is measured in the 4-5 million numbers? 75,000 is less than 10% of 1 million. Now make that 2 million and it's less than 5% of the market. 4 million and it's less than 2.5%. And you can bet just during the years of production that a lot of farmers traded in an old baler on a new one or wore one out, parked it in a tree row and bought another. So just for speculation 4 million farmers bought balers between the introduction of the roto baler and when production was stopped. 2 million of those replace that baler at least once in that time. So that would mean about 6 million balers sold new (remember this is speculation). Most folks running a business see numbers like that and consider the product a failure. A product has to either grab a significant piece of market share, or sell a tremendous volume to be considered a success.

Heck where would the dairy farmer be is only 2.5% of the population consumed dairy products? Or ate bread?

Rick
 
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oldtanker
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 7:03 am    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Destroked 450 wrote:
(quoted from post at 18:51:04 11/17/1Cool
We had both, 1st cutting we square baled and put in the barn, 2nd cutting we rolled with the rotobaler and left in the field.
In the fall we'ed turn the cows in and once they had eaten the forage we'ed go out and chop open 8-10 of those small rolls with a axe, we rolled them so tight the cows couldn't eat them until we chopped them open.
Each day go check the cows and chop open some more rolls until all where eaten in that field, then move cattle to the next field and start again. Fields that we rolled but didn't put cattle on we'd load on wagons and spread them in other fields where cattle would be later, never stored those small rolls in barns or sheds.

Dad did the adjusting on the baler but I was making bales with it and our WD Allis when I was 10, I would bale all day without the baler needing any adjustments. Safety was turning to pto off before getting off the tractor to do anything to the baler, if dad bought me off of a tractor while the pto was running I'd have trouble setting for a week.
With the pto running they were very dangerous, rotobaler took one mans arms and killed another not far from us, same baler, same farm one year apart, hired help.

Dad sold one of the farms in 70 due to health reasons and down sized the herd, didn't need the extra bales after that and quite using the rotobaler, brother sold in for scrap in the late 80's.


That sounds like a wise way to use the bales!

Rick
 
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Ted in NE-OH
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 8:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Because it is different and unique. The G fits that and that is why they sell for a higher price.
 
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MJMJ
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2018 3:16 am    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'll say it, they were a PITA when compared to small squares. It was certainly better than loose hay, but once small square balers were easily attainable, small rounds didn't make sense for anyone that wasn't leaving them in the field.
 
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2018 4:21 am    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Just had to be fixed for them,I've handled thousands of square and small round bales I'd rather handle the rounds.
 
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MJMJ
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2018 4:59 am    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Small rounds required another trip around the field picking them up. That in itself was reason for a lot of people to go with squares.
 
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dr p
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 2:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I still make a couple thousand rotobaler a year. It is
definitely a different culture from making small square bales,
and don't get me wrong, it's no fun picking up oversize
rotobales because there grass got too tall. But you can't
compare it with a modern small square bales in terms of
capacity. But against a 14t or a ih 46, a correctly set
rotobaler could make a lot more hay.

I think the second factor that the rotobaler makes a lot more
palatable product. My cows will pick rotobaler hay over small
square bales EVERY TIME! NOT sure it's because there are no bent
sharp pieces or because hay in a round bale tends not to be
dusty

The other factor was cost. A rotobaler was significantly less
expensive than a small square bales. I think a lot of rotobaler
were sold as an alternative to using a custom service, not to
buying a small square baler.

I think if allis Chalmers had been able to make the number ten
work, and continued to make engineering advances, the rotobaler
could have been more successful. Allis Chalmers seem to have
products that conceptually ahead of their time but couldn't
quite"finish the job". I use a 110 manure spreader every day but
had they just made an auger instead of the stupid table chain.
It would have made every other spreader instantly obsolete
 
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JD Seller
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:11 am    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Several fellows had them around here. The one great use I saw for them, and have done myself, is to bale pasture grass that not pastured in the summer. Just bale the bales and let them lay. Let the cows in after the first snow. They will dig down and eat them as they need them. Labor saving way to store hay for early winter. Also you end up with the manure spread more evenly around the field. Be fore we started running more cows and had more fields with good fence, we bales 2-3 fields each year with a AC Roto baler. Just quit in the late 1990s.
 
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2018 5:01 am    Post subject: Re: Roto baler question? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Even back in the early 60's I remember people were saying AC needed to build a Roto Baler a tractor like a WD or D17 could pick up and carry around.
 
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