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LTX?

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Mr.Ferguson
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2019 7:42 pm    Post subject: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Is there any info on this machine left? I found some pictures but that?s about it. I would like to know more about it. Anything on it is great
 
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ghostdncr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:01 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.
The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.
The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).
Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.
Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.
Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.
In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.
A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype. a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.
The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously. one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.

The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had began to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of
what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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ghostdncr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:01 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.
The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.
The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).
Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.
Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.
Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.
In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.
A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype. a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.
The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously. one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.

The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had began to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of
what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:06 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote


It was a UK Ferguson prototype killed off during the merger with Massey Ferguson as it was perceived to be a direct competitor to , I think the FE35 or perhaps it was the 65 . There was one that made it into private ownership for a few years , this was eventually bought back by Massey Ferguson and great pains were taken to destroy it completely. Only a few photos remain as proof of its existence. All drawings and engineering specifications and tooling were also destroyed .
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:06 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype. a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.
The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously. one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.

The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had began to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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ghostdncr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:10 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:

[img]https://forums.yesterdaystractors.com/photos/mvphoto30078.jpg[/img]


Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype. a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.
The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously. one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.

The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had began to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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ghostdncr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:21 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.

Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.



A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype. a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.
The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously. one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.


The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had began to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of
what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:22 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.

Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.



A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype. a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.
The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously. one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.


The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had began to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of
what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:31 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype, a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.

The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously, one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, and International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.

The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had begun to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of
what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:35 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype, a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.

The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously, one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, and International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.

The ill-fated TO-60 tractor By Paul Nelson

Perhaps no tractor in history that was never put into production has played such a pivotal role in the corporate life of any farm equipment manufacturer as did the ill-fated Ferguson LTX (Large Tractor Experimental). For half a century now the story has flitted through the halls of Ferguson/MF culture like a ghost, taking on legendary characteristics among its still-loyal core of supporters.

Known to the Ferguson engineers in the UK as the LTX, the experimental tractor was called the F-60 or TE-60 after the covers were partially pulled off its secret status, and referred to as the TO-60 on the west side of the Atlantic.

In the early 1940s Ford-Ferguson engineers had toyed with the idea of a larger tractor to be produced in addition to the 9N/2N. After a prototype had been built (known as the 4P) engineers of both Ferguson and Ford evaluated the project.

Ferguson determined that it had little merit and the project was dropped. By 1947 Ferguson marketing people, realized that the “little gray Fergie” was facing increasing competition from larger and improved tractors planned and being built by competitors, both in the European and North American markets. Dealers were complaining about not having a larger Ferguson tractor available to buy. So the LTX large tractor project was initiated in early 1948.

Plans were being made to build the new tractor in Detroit for the North American market. It was to be called the TO-60. On June 22, 1953, Harry Ferguson wrote a letter to all US Ferguson dealers, extolling the virtues of the proposed new tractor, suggesting that it could be in production by 1954 and urging them to put in advance orders immediately. Harry Ferguson, Inc. of Detroit was struggling financially.
Harry had begun to consider forming a working relationship with Massey-Harris, hoping to sell them some of his tractors and implements. He knew that the M-H line of tractors, particularly the larger tractors, was obsolete. When he made the decision to offer his entire world-wide operations for sale to M-H rather than to pursue a working relationship, he saw his beloved LTX as the center piece of
what he hoped would be the “bait” in his negotiations over the sale.

These talks began shortly after writing the letter to Ferguson dealers about his new “large” tractor. During negotiations with Jim Duncan, President of M-H, Ferguson made elaborate arrangements to have M-H top personnel see a demonstration of the LTX. He wrote a letter to Duncan inviting him to a meeting in the UK on August 4, 1953, dangling the prospect of seeing a demonstration of an extraordinary tractor prototype. In his carefully worded invitation, Ferguson wrote: “If we have a satisfactory talk then we will proceed at once with your technical investigation and the necessary demonstrations. The only qualm is that we may not be able to get conditions sufficiently difficult to show the merits of our big new tractor. . . . It is these technical investigations which will create that necessary confidence between us which could not be created in any other way. . . . A company can be no greater than its products and I know that we have something of immense value to put before you for the whole future of your company.”

Shortly after the details of the sale agreement between Ferguson and Duncan had been established, but before the M-H engineers had arrived to see the demonstration, Ferguson called Duncan aside and suggested that he should put Harry in charge of all Ferguson engineering, that all engineering proposals would come to Ferguson, and that Harry would have control of all Ferguson equipment. Duncan agreed to this, a decision he deeply regretted later. This was apparently Ferguson’s way of trying to guarantee that the LTX would be built. He concluded the sale to Massey-Harris with reason to believe it would happen. Many UK and European farmers were eager to buy a larger version of the beloved TEA-20. Ferguson people in the UK were concerned about the competition from the new low Fordson
Major and tractors from other European manufacturers. Harry Ferguson saw the LTX as the answer to demands in both European and North American markets for a larger tractor.

The new LTX prototype had improved hydraulic controls and a two-stage clutch. The hydraulic pump had three cylinders and its Category 2 link system was designed to lift up to 6,000 pounds. The transmission had five forward speeds and one reverse. Diesel engines of 2, 3, 4, and 6 cylinders were anticipated to provide for a wide variety of models to meet multiple needs, both as farm tractors and
as industrial models.

Eight LTX prototype tractors are believed to have been built. Three years of Intensive, highly secretive testing of the tractors on a 620-acre farm in Warwickshire had produced some truly impressive results. Various engines were tried, both Diesel and gasoline. The tractor chassis and transmission were designed to be able to handle engines up to 100 hp. Reportedly, one of the engines tested produced
so much power it actually tore the lugs off the rubber tires on dry soil. It was capable of pulling a five-bottom plow under some conditions. To the chagrin of M-H personnel, when demonstrated against the M-H 745 (the UKversion of the M-H 44) the LTX ran circles around it.

Meanwhile, other developments took place that contributed to the ultimate decision to not build the large tractor. In March of 1954, two months after the sale went into effect, top officials of the newly-named M-H-F met in San Antonio, Texas, for a corporate strategy conference. Harry Ferguson was absent. He was not well physically and had temporarily stepped back from his major role in engineering decisions.
One of the primary topics at San Antonio was the need for new, larger tractors. This led to heated discussions about what to do with the experimental large tractor that Ferguson had been pushing so hard. Several factors against it were cited. One was the tremendous tooling costs that would result from any decision to build the TO-60 in Detroit.

A replacement for the TO-30 was considered urgent and the conferees agreed that development of the TO-35 should take priority. North American based Ferguson and M-H engineers believed that the tractor was unsuitable for the North American market. They argued that it was a four-wheel tractor, never designed to be used in a row-crop configuration (something that was very important to the US tractor market) and when modified to a tricycle design, would have an unsightly look.

The North American engineers also believed that the gasoline engine planned for use in the TO-60 would have to be run at 2000 RPM to reach maximum torque and that this speed would result in short engine life.

M-H-F Chief Engineer Herman Klemm, who had repeatedly tangled with Harry Ferguson over Klemm’s desire to produce the TO-35, spoke against building the TO-60 and urged support for the TO-35, to be built with components strong enough to be used in larger versions for M-H dealers (M-H 50 and MF 65). Klemm was directed to do an engineering feasibility study of the LTX within three months.

After the study was completed, Klemm said “No.” The TO-60 was dropped and eventually the order was given to cut up all prototypes and to destroy all engineering drawings. All evidence of the secret project was to be “buried.”

When Harry Ferguson received word about the decision to not produce the TO-60, he was broken-hearted. His relationship with James Duncan soured. Ferguson, realizing that his dream of building the TO-60 was going up in flames along with his influence in M-H-F affairs, resigned from his position on the Board of Directors and soon sold his stock in the company. An era had ended.

In a final footnote of irony, Erik Fredriksen, a Norwegian who had worked for Massey Ferguson for 37 years, reports in his 2000 publication, “The Legendary LTX Tractor,“ that in 1970 an English farmer (who may have been given the tractor to test during the LTX project?) came to MF asking for help in repairing a clutch problem on an LTX prototype. He had been using the tractor for 400-500 hours per year for about 15 years, plowing and tilling with very little mechanical trouble. They agreed to fix the tractor but instead quickly confiscated it and, incredibly, cut it up! When the LTX/TO-60 project was cancelled, the Ferguson team, which had lovingly labored so hard and so long to design, test, and produce what many of them believe would be a state-of the-art tractor even today, felt betrayed.

Fredriksen summed up their feelings with these poignant words:
Many believe it was a monumental mistake that cost Massey Ferguson dearly as the new low Fordson Major tractor and other “large” tractors were left free to roam the big farms on heavy soil where the lighter Ferguson tractors did not have credibility.

Engineering favorites and company politics won the day.

Author’s Note: Our thanks to the authors of the following books from which much of the background information for this article was drawn:
A Global Corporation, by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,
1969.
The Ferguson Tractor Story, by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing,
2000.
The Legendary LTX Tractor, by Erik Fredriksen, 2000.
The Massey Legacy, Vol. One, by John Farnworth, Farming Press,
1997.
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:37 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype, a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.

The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously, one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, and International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:45 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype, a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.

The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously, one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, and International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.
 
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ghostdncr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:46 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:




Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype, a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.

The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously, one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, and International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.
 
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 1:47 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

This is about all I've got. Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of a TO30 for secrecy during testing:

[img]https://forums.yesterdaystractors.com/photos/mvphoto30079.jpg[/img]


Developing the LTX: At the time of the takeover, Ferguson's Banner Lane engineers were developing a new tractor, the TE-60 or LTX (Large Tractor Experimental) and a few prototypes had undergone extensive testing. During the war years, Ferguson and Ford had done experimental work on a large Ferguson System tractor but never made a production prototype. The planned new tractor became one of the most important projects undertaken by the Banner Lane engineering department.

The Ferguson team designed the LTX engine. The chassis and drive train were designed to take up to 100 hp, but the first models were to be in the 45 to 60 hp range. In 1949, the tractor and a range of implements were tested at the Hyatt family farm near the Warwickshire village of Ufton in England. It is believed that six prototypes were tested at the farm. One of the six was left there and used until about 1970, when it suffered mechanical problems. The farmer contacted Massey Ferguson at Banner Lane about his "Big Fergie." Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up.

The LTX was at an advanced stage when, on May 13, 1953, Ferguson's British distributors received a letter requesting orders for the new 48 hp tractors for delivery in spring 1954. Ferguson expected the tractor to go into production, but senior management decided the tractor was unsuited to the American market because they could not produce a row-crop version. Instead, the decision was made to improve the American-designed TO-35 in lieu of producing the LTX. In 1954, the project was abandoned and Massey Ferguson is said to have destroyed all records, parts and prototypes (with the exception of the Ufton tractor).

Morale suffered at Banner Lane, where many Ferguson engineers felt let down and suspected a bias toward Massey-Harris engineering and products. Parallel dealer networks continued to operate independently, and pricing of Banner Lane tractors was a contentious issue. Sir John Black's Standard Motor Co. owed much of its post-war prosperity to the tractor business. After negotiations with Ferguson and Massey-Harris's Canadian management, Black agreed to a £20 ($56 U.S.) reduction to tractor manufacturing costs and signed a contract to manufacture tractors for another 12 years.
Instead of reducing the tractor price, however, Duncan reinvested the savings into the company. This infuriated Ferguson, who wanted it passed on to farmers. Ferguson had believed his price reducing system would be adopted as company policy when the companies merged.

Another failed partnership: In 1950, Ferguson set up his own automotive research facility, Harry Ferguson Research, to design a four-wheel drive car, the R5, which he thought would improve road safety. If, during the buyout, Duncan and Massey Ferguson management assumed the four-wheel drive project would fill Ferguson's time, they were very much mistaken.

Expecting to exercise the complete authority given him over the design of all Ferguson equipment and to be consulted in all matters, Ferguson came to believe Massey Ferguson design engineers were sidelining his suggestions. Those concerns were compounded by the fact that his price reducing system was not adopted, and by the final indignity, the decision to abandon the LTX.

In April 1954, he offered his resignation, which became official on July 7, 1954. Massey-Harris purchased Ferguson's shares for about $15 million (roughly $122 million today). Terms of the agreement blocked the 70-year-old Ferguson from re-entering the tractor business for five years.


A couple of quotes from Chapter 4 'The MF65' in the book 'Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 models in detail' by Michael Thorne.

"In the early 1940s, Ford-Ferguson engineers produced five prototypes of a scaled-up Ford 9N. One of these machines, numbered P4, was shipped to Fletchampstead Highway, the development office of Harry Ferguson Ltd, in 1948 to be used as a backdrop to the development work on the Ferguson, Large Tractor Experimental (LTX)."

"Development of five LTX prototypes, three with petrol engines and two with diesel, was put in hand in 1948 in strict secrecy. The (planned) production model would be known as the TE60, rated at 56bhp at 2000rpm, according to a document dated 8 October 1953."

The book goes on to say that the LTX ran rings around a Massey-Harris 744, but at a product policy meeting in Texas in March 1954, North American sales staff weren't impressed with having no easy option for a tricycle wheel layout, plus for cost-saving reasons it was cheaper to use MF35 parts to create a larger tractor (MF65) at Banner Lane rather than starting from scratch.

So the LTX was binned and the MF65 Mk1 developed and first appeared in December 1957.

"In 1949, main testing was moved to (the Hyatt family) farm near Ufton, Warwickshire. Appropriate implements had been constructed, and a five-bottom plow was installed. The first prototype, a gas version, was shown to Harry Ferguson, who plowed several rounds with it working perfectly. "Give it 1,000 hours; he said, and left the field. Plowing sixteen hours per day rain or shine followed. The only trouble reported was that the combination of power and traction soon stripped the lugs off the rear tires. The tire manufacturer provided stronger tires and testing resumed.

The LTX resembled a scaled-up TO-35. It used the same type of front axle, fenders, and hood. It was slightly smaller than the new British Fordson Major, but perhaps 25 percent larger than the TO-35. At the time of the merger in 1953, all testing of the LTX prototypes was halted. By then, Herman Klemm was Managing Director of Harry Ferguson, Inc., the North American division under Massey-Harris-Ferguson. The TO-35 had been Klemm's baby through its development. He favored growing the TO-35 rather than building a totally new design such as the LTX. The Massey-Harris people also were not favorably disposed toward the LTX, by then known as the Ferguson 60, because it did not cater to the row-crop configuration.

Eventually, Klemm was given the authority to decide the tractor's fate. On June 10, 1954, Klemm swung the axe. Further, Klemm ordered the prototypes drawings and associated design data destroyed. Miraculously, one prototype escaped, safely harbored at the Ufton farm. The farm's owner used it for around 500 hours in routine chores. In 1970, however, the clutch went out. The farmer, Mr. Hyatt, requested a replacement. Company officials are reputed to have collected the tractor, taken it to Banner Lane and subsequently cut it up. Mr. Hyatt never saw it again. In retrospect, the Ferguson people were right in their assertions that the Ferguson 60 was the right tractor for the times. If the tractor had been released for production in 1953, the company would have had a superior competitor to the Fordson New Major. It also would have had the jump on other utility configuration offerings as the Ford 800 Series, Oliver Super 55, and International 300 Utility, which all appeared in 1955. Deere had already entered the utility market in 1947 with its Model M. By 1973, the tricycle-front row-crop configuration was gone from the scene, replaced entirely by the utility front."

Found in the 'Big Book of Massey Tractors: The Complete History of Massey-Harris.' by Robert Pripps.
 
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ghostdncr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 2:35 am    Post subject: Re: LTX? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Sounds like the LTX project grew into the Massey-Ferguson 85/88 when all was said and done, but that's just my interpretation based on reading and photographic evidence. Here's the only LTX photo I know of and have no way of verifying its authenticity. I seem to recall reading that the tractor was stylized along the lines of the smaller Ferguson tractors for secrecy during testing:



As I understand it, only one of the prototypes survived up until around 1970 when it was brought to MF for a clutch repair. They seized it and cut it right up for scrap, destroying it just like they had all other prototypes, blueprints, engineering data, etc.


Some books that include passages about the LTX include the following, and may be worth tracking down if you don't already have them:

Chapter 4, "The MF65" in the book "Massey Ferguson 35 and 65 Models in Detail" by Michael Thorne.

"A Global Corporation" by E. P. Neufeld, University of Toronto Press,1969

"The Ferguson Tractor Story" by Stuart Gibbard, Old Pond Publishing, 2000

"The Legendary LTX Tractor" by Erik Fredriksen, 2000

"The Massey Legacy, Vol. One" by John Farnworth, Farming Press, 1997
 
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