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Rust Removal Methods

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showcrop
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Joined: 13 Dec 2000
Posts: 23260
Location: Chester NH

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 12:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 11:24:27 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 13:01:42 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:00:06 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 14:23:13 04/27/19)
CVPost-69hemi wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:10:01 04/27/19) Not a small soaking project. I talking plow size...


Hemi, as I posted first, flap wheel. If you have not used one before you will want a respirator mask because you will be in a cloud of rust dust. I assume that you are restoring so you will need to follow up with rust converter to kill the rust in the pits.


Flap wheels are really good at gouging and making a wavy finish, especially if you have never used one.

There really is no replacement for sand blasting.


No way I would sandblast a plow share, LOL. I would have to follow up with a flap wheel to smooth it.


I thought this was to be painted? You can create gobs of wave with a flap wheel that will look like garbage with paint on them.


Yes Yakob, I suppose one could create waves with them. I have been using them for over ten years. They are not good on sheet metal but on structural steel and cast iron like a plow they work great! Also just so you know I don't like doing jobs that end up looking like garbage.
 
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yakob
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Joined: 04 Jan 2019
Posts: 212


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 12:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 15:23:06 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 11:24:27 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 13:01:42 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:00:06 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 14:23:13 04/27/19)
CVPost-69hemi wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:10:01 04/27/19) Not a small soaking project. I talking plow size...


Hemi, as I posted first, flap wheel. If you have not used one before you will want a respirator mask because you will be in a cloud of rust dust. I assume that you are restoring so you will need to follow up with rust converter to kill the rust in the pits.


Flap wheels are really good at gouging and making a wavy finish, especially if you have never used one.

There really is no replacement for sand blasting.


No way I would sandblast a plow share, LOL. I would have to follow up with a flap wheel to smooth it.


I thought this was to be painted? You can create gobs of wave with a flap wheel that will look like garbage with paint on them.


Yes Yakob, I suppose one could create waves with them. I have been using them for over ten years. They are not good on sheet metal but on structural steel and cast iron like a plow they work great! Also just so you know I don't like doing jobs that end up looking like garbage.


Did anyone suggest that you did "like doing jobs that end up looking like garbage"?

I was merely pointing out the downside to using a flap wheel, which is coincidentally NOT a downside to sandblasting.

Can you please elaborate on why sandblasting a plow share would be an "LOL" situation?
 
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showcrop
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Joined: 13 Dec 2000
Posts: 23260
Location: Chester NH

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:50 pm    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 13:57:54 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 15:23:06 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 11:24:27 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 13:01:42 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:00:06 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 14:23:13 04/27/19)
CVPost-69hemi wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:10:01 04/27/19) Not a small soaking project. I talking plow size...


Hemi, as I posted first, flap wheel. If you have not used one before you will want a respirator mask because you will be in a cloud of rust dust. I assume that you are restoring so you will need to follow up with rust converter to kill the rust in the pits.


Flap wheels are really good at gouging and making a wavy finish, especially if you have never used one.

There really is no replacement for sand blasting.


No way I would sandblast a plow share, LOL. I would have to follow up with a flap wheel to smooth it.


I thought this was to be painted? You can create gobs of wave with a flap wheel that will look like garbage with paint on them.


Yes Yakob, I suppose one could create waves with them. I have been using them for over ten years. They are not good on sheet metal but on structural steel and cast iron like a plow they work great! Also just so you know I don't like doing jobs that end up looking like garbage.


Did anyone suggest that you did "like doing jobs that end up looking like garbage"?

I was merely pointing out the downside to using a flap wheel, which is coincidentally NOT a downside to sandblasting.

Can you please elaborate on why sandblasting a plow share would be an "LOL" situation?


Yakob, if you need to ask that question I don't think that I can help you, LOL.
 
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yakob
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Joined: 04 Jan 2019
Posts: 212


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2019 4:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 17:50:03 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 13:57:54 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 15:23:06 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 11:24:27 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 13:01:42 04/29/19)
yakob wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:00:06 04/29/19)
showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 14:23:13 04/27/19)
CVPost-69hemi wrote:
(quoted from post at 10:10:01 04/27/19) Not a small soaking project. I talking plow size...


Hemi, as I posted first, flap wheel. If you have not used one before you will want a respirator mask because you will be in a cloud of rust dust. I assume that you are restoring so you will need to follow up with rust converter to kill the rust in the pits.


Flap wheels are really good at gouging and making a wavy finish, especially if you have never used one.

There really is no replacement for sand blasting.


No way I would sandblast a plow share, LOL. I would have to follow up with a flap wheel to smooth it.


I thought this was to be painted? You can create gobs of wave with a flap wheel that will look like garbage with paint on them.


Yes Yakob, I suppose one could create waves with them. I have been using them for over ten years. They are not good on sheet metal but on structural steel and cast iron like a plow they work great! Also just so you know I don't like doing jobs that end up looking like garbage.


Did anyone suggest that you did "like doing jobs that end up looking like garbage"?

I was merely pointing out the downside to using a flap wheel, which is coincidentally NOT a downside to sandblasting.

Can you please elaborate on why sandblasting a plow share would be an "LOL" situation?


Yakob, if you need to ask that question I don't think that I can help you, LOL.


I suspect there could be other reasons you are unable to answer that and choose instead to divert with more "LOL."

There is absolutely nothing wrong with sandblasting in this application.
 
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catalina0029
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Joined: 16 Oct 2018
Posts: 71


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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 5:59 pm    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Wouldn't dragging it through the dirt behind a tractor shine it up?
 
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yakob
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Joined: 04 Jan 2019
Posts: 212


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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 6:38 pm    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

catalina0029 wrote:
(quoted from post at 20:59:02 05/15/19) Wouldn't dragging it through the dirt behind a tractor shine it up?


Yep! Problem with that is that if it's gonna rust or need coated in grease to keep that shine, or it will rust.

Likely these old plows are pitted anyway. I really don't see what the issue is with blasting it...
 
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yakob
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Posts: 212


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PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2019 6:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Ehh...I didn't proof read. Had a couple beers tonight...I think you get my drift.
 
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showcrop
Tractor Guru


Joined: 13 Dec 2000
Posts: 23260
Location: Chester NH

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 3:12 am    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

catalina0029 wrote:
(quoted from post at 18:59:02 05/15/19) Wouldn't dragging it through the dirt behind a tractor shine it up?


Catalina, there have been literally hundreds of posts here over the years about scouring plows. While sandy soils will scour light rust from a moldboard fairly quickly, clay laden soils or "gumbo" type, which are very common, tend to stick to the moldboard, prompting much frustration when the owner needs to turn his ground. As you know, a plow that is fresh out of the ground and fully scoured will be as shinny as chrome. The roughness of the rust needs to be removed in order for the plow to slide through clay, and sandblasting it off will make the surface even rougher, and unusable until significant repair work is done on it.
 
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yakob
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Posts: 212


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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 3:29 am    Post subject: Re: Rust Removal Methods Reply to specific post Reply with quote

showcrop wrote:
(quoted from post at 06:12:23 05/16/19)
catalina0029 wrote:
(quoted from post at 18:59:02 05/15/19) Wouldn't dragging it through the dirt behind a tractor shine it up?


Catalina, there have been literally hundreds of posts here over the years about scouring plows. While sandy soils will scour light rust from a moldboard fairly quickly, clay laden soils or "gumbo" type, which are very common, tend to stick to the moldboard, prompting much frustration when the owner needs to turn his ground. As you know, a plow that is fresh out of the ground and fully scoured will be as shinny as chrome. The roughness of the rust needs to be removed in order for the plow to slide through clay, and sandblasting it off will make the surface even rougher, and unusable until significant repair work is done on it.


LOL
 
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