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Tractor hauler

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Roger Tomfohrde
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 12:20 pm    Post subject: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Is it easier to drive a truck that has a 6500LB tractor on it or is a pickup with trailer carrying the tractor easier to handle. Can a same size/smaller engine be better at moving the load? Yes I know there is more issues getting one loaded but I was wondering that when the load was on what happens during the trip. I am looking at a medium duty truck with a 18 foot flat bed that would carry the tractor, I was trying to figure out if that is the best route to go. Right now I use a 3/4 ton suburban and rented trailers but it is maxed out especially for on the free way. I probably would put between 5 and 8 thousand miles on in a year. Curious before I spend the money and then do not like it, I have not driven a truck like it before so have no experience. I kind of would like to start taking them to show/pulls.
 
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SVcummins
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 3:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I like a one ton truck the best because you can use it for other work besides just hauling tractors when you unhook the trailer . I have contemplated loading the 3020 on the two ton truck a few times it would be awfully heavy but pretty doable I think


But then you also have to have a trailer so that?s another investment but you?ll find you will use it a lot more than you think
 
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 5:59 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Most guys get a pick-up of adequate size to pull a trailer of adequate size. Then you use the pick-up for many other uses and hook the trailer up only when needed. It is a whole lot easier to maintain one truck than two.
 
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VicS
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2019 7:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I usted to haul tractors on a roll back single axle truck in another life. But I haul on a gooseneck 15000 lb. Trailer and a 4x4 4door 10000 lb. 3/4 truck. No comparison the F250 drives, rides, handles and especially goes around curves better. Easier to get into also. And generally you can afford a better one because it is multi use. But a dual wheel F350,450,550 would be better still. Be sure and get a gooseneck, you won't be sorry.
 
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rustyfarmall
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 3:58 am    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote


A medium duty truck requires a CDL.
 
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Welding man
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 4:26 am    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

That kindly depends where you are. Our state has a CDL exemption for farmers, that is good from 26,001 all the the way up to 80,000# if you are hauling farm products, supplies or machinery inside the state lines.
 
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Roger Tomfohrde
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 8:27 am    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Interesting, now I am wondering what does not require a CDL in WI,MN I thought if I stayed under 20000 and was not hauling for hire I would have been OK. This truck is rated at 16000 gross weight. Now I will
need to dig into it farther to be sure. The options for using it as a tow vehicle are good but then I thought it would be easier to hit the 26001 rating depending on the trailer. Cheap enough and in reality is
an oversize ton Chevy is why I was looking at it. I may get to play farmer again sometime but it is not now.
 
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Tony C.
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 11:18 am    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Of course you would have been OK with the 16K truck, you can run any truck up to 26K without CDL. Personally I'd rather drive the straight truck with no trailer.

Go with whatever you will get the most use out of and will be able to load easily and carry the weight safely. You can even pull a 10K trailer behind a 26K truck and no CDL needdd. As long as you have a loading dock or a hillside gully to back into just drive the tractor on, I see guys doing that all the time. You may want to compare insurance and registration costs for the various configurations.
 
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mmfan55
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 07, 2019 12:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Tony C is accurate on CDL requirements as per the FMCSA rules and regulations guide. No federal cdl required under 26001# unless passenger or haz mat endorsement required
 
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BarryfromIA
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 5:36 am    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

You will want something easy and safe to load. So look at the low bed trailers with a tilt bed section. And remember part of the tail on that type of trailer is ramp not load deck.
 
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jd man wis
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2019 5:14 am    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I my self like having a truck that at a lot of times did not get push around some on the roads. It also makes you feel safe and you are if any thing should happen with the trailer. Not to scare you but there was a trailer I was hauling with a tractor that the back shackle bolt broke and maken the axle go back in to the fender maken it swerve into the other lane and the truck was a f150 ford pick up boy did I have my hands full getting it to stop.
 
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1 Acre Warrior
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 2:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote


Late to this discussion, but as a guy whose first run in a semi was in 1975, and who has run pretty much everything except reefer and in every state except Alaska, my advice is:

GET A TRAILER.

WITH ELECTRIC BRAKES.

And maybe a 1-ton or better dually pickup to tow it. If you have your choice, go Diesel, you can find older ones at good prices. But if you don't have the budget, your 3/4-ton Sub should work okay, I've pulled up to vehicle capacity trailers behind my 3/4-ton Diesel Sub with no complaints.

The trailer makes a big difference -- your less-than-wonderful experiences with rental trailers are because they use surge brakes. A good controller in the tow vehicle and electric brakes on the trailer will be a world of difference.

Why a trailer instead of the truck? First, think about what you want to do. You want to put a heavy load on this, and go blasting down the highway with it.

The problem is that highways are not flat and straight, so every curve, dip, bump and pothole will affect the vehicle, and the load on the vehicle. The closer that load (and center of gravity) is to the ground, the less the total effect will be on the whole combination. I've seen flatbed trucks on their sides, but can't think of a single time that I saw a low flatbed trailer like that.

Second, think about how you will load and unload. Low is easier, which is another reason to go for the car hauler. Stick a cheap winch on the front and pull the tractor up (BACKWARD -- I could tell you stories) by the tool mount, and you're ready to go.

Third, compare the registration costs of a trailer to those of any motor vehicle.

Fourth, consider that trailers are largely problem-free. Good tires, good lights and well-lubed bearings are pretty much all you need.

Fifth, even below CDL weight limit, your business-class truck has to put into every scale, while the Sub or dually towing a trailer cruises right past. Nothing good ever happens in scales. Scales are populated by people who are being PAID to find reasons that your truck should not be on the road, and most of them are very good at the job. Consider the difference in maintenance levels between the truck that averages 600 miles a day and yours, doing 6000 miles a year -- and they still find plenty wrong with the professionals. You would be meat on the table!

Sixth, let's say you're 500 miles from home and the engine gulps a valve. With the business-class, that means a big-rig tow to a big-cost repair shop. With the Sub or dually, that means a car tow to a car shop. If the problem, is serious, you get a ride home, pick up another tow vehicle, come back for the trailer, drag the tractor home, then take that same trailer back for the Suburban (depending on the trailer, maybe even for the dually).

The bottom line is that the simpler the solution, the better the solution.
 
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RobCons
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:42 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I like a trailer. Its what I've always used. My bumper pull is just a standard 16 foot double axle 7000 lb unit with electric brakes. A Suburban would handle it fine. I like the utility version (it has sides) trailer so I can haul other stuff as needed.
 
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Aleuicius
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Depends who you read or talk to. If you read the relevant bits of CFR49, you will see that it ONLY applies to those who make their living "in the business of transportation" and noting that "in the business" means it is your primary source of income.
You will also note the exceptions declaring these rules do not apply to those who use intermittent transportation of goods in support of what IS their primary business/source of income. (i.e. hauling livestock to show, dirt for/from excavation, etc). The only category of non-transportation businesses affected are those intimately connected to it such as docks/warehouse at each end (implies interstates, but. . ), and service vehicles for actual interstate transport equipment. Thus, the hvac, plumbing, farriers, and other services need not apply.
All that said, the enforcers only know as much as they are told. This means you can still be ticketed if you are an individual hauling personal (or sale) items to a show (whether you claim it to IRS or not) and your choice is fight, or just pay the cheaper fine.
It may make sense for some individuals to back down, but I can't believe businesses and trade organizations haven't stepped up. After all, this is how the bureaucrats get regulations to "creep" ever farther into our lives. THEY think winning a ribbon is the same as "being in a business" and that ANY business is subject to the limited scope of 49CFR.
Just a note to those who believe that: READ it. You will also see that anything from motorcycles to the largest semi can be "commercial vehicles" and that to operate ANY of these as an interstate transport business, you will need an appropriate CDL. Then there are the States 'intrastate' rules (tho those are mostly copied blindly from USDOT regs that are already bastardized)
Have fun!
 
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showcrop
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 3:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Tractor hauler Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Aleuicius wrote:
(quoted from post at 13:49:24 11/25/19) Depends who you read or talk to. If you read the relevant bits of CFR49, you will see that it ONLY applies to those who make their living "in the business of transportation" and noting that "in the business" means it is your primary source of income.
You will also note the exceptions declaring these rules do not apply to those who use intermittent transportation of goods in support of what IS their primary business/source of income. (i.e. hauling livestock to show, dirt for/from excavation, etc). The only category of non-transportation businesses affected are those intimately connected to it such as docks/warehouse at each end (implies interstates, but. . ), and service vehicles for actual interstate transport equipment. Thus, the hvac, plumbing, farriers, and other services need not apply.
All that said, the enforcers only know as much as they are told. This means you can still be ticketed if you are an individual hauling personal (or sale) items to a show (whether you claim it to IRS or not) and your choice is fight, or just pay the cheaper fine.
It may make sense for some individuals to back down, but I can't believe businesses and trade organizations haven't stepped up. After all, this is how the bureaucrats get regulations to "creep" ever farther into our lives. THEY think winning a ribbon is the same as "being in a business" and that ANY business is subject to the limited scope of 49CFR.
Just a note to those who believe that: READ it. You will also see that anything from motorcycles to the largest semi can be "commercial vehicles" and that to operate ANY of these as an interstate transport business, you will need an appropriate CDL. Then there are the States 'intrastate' rules (tho those are mostly copied blindly from USDOT regs that are already bastardized)
Have fun!


Aleuicius, you need to read it. Is commerce taking place? Are you crossing state lines with you company truck that has a GVW of over 10,000? Whether you are carrying your own stuff or somebody elses, whether it is company tools your own supplies, if commerce of any type is taking place you need a DOT number. I ran a business for 25 years where we delivered our own goods to our customers in three states, and our trucks were never for hire, but we were required to be registered with DOT.
 
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