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Is there more money in cobb corn?

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Michael Price
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 7:50 pm    Post subject: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Im wondering if theres more money in cobb corn then in just feild corn taken off the cobb?

 
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IaGary
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 4:15 am    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

What do you mean by cob corn?

If your talking about field corn picked on the cob.

Then no, there is really no more value to it.

If your refering to sweet corn that is eaten by humans then, yes there is more value per acre if you work it right.

Gary



 

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JMS/MN
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 9:37 am    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Occasionally you might find a dairyman that wants cob corn because of the extra fiber, but they are few and far between. If they utilize the cob, they're set up with the right harvesting equipment to do their own. You'd have to do your own market research/development. Most commercial elevators aren't set up to handle cob corn anymore. Maybe a small local feed mill would be interested.

 
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paul
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 10:12 am    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Not 'here'. Don't know of a way to sell it, other than small bags squirrel feed or shell it.

I hear of other places, getting $1 a bu more or something. Would love that.

Gotta give your location for a question like this.

--->Paul

 

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Michael Price
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 12:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I live in southern MI. There is a small feed mill about 8 miles from here I may ask them if they want it.

 
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kyhayman
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 2:16 pm    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

All depends on location. In the serious grain states, shelled corn is about the only market. Around here (must be a KY and TN thing) ear corn brings a premium. Both local feed mills pay $1 a bushel premium over shelled corn posted price. Of course a bushel of ear corn is heavier so you that counts against you. They have people bringing corn from a couple of hundred miles away for the premiums.

Its all in the culture and perception, its the old timer gospel here that shelled corn is too rich for cattle and will cause them to founder. In reality its the fact that for years and years most cattle here were in such poor body condition if they got enough of anything to eat they would founder on it. Either that, or the fact that most fences are so bad here that if the cows belly isnt full she can get out any time she chooses. Creep feeding a momma cow all the corn she wants is a foundering proposition. The other 'customary belief' is that why would anyone throw all that good feed (corn cobs) out on the ground. I've quit arguing with them, I just let them think Im strange ordering a truck load od corn glutten and a truck load of soybean hulls, then having them mixed and bagged.

 

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MyrlfromPA
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 23, 2006 4:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I pick all my corn and crib it. I sell a good bit localy on the cob but what i use to make my horse feed is shelled first however I also run the empty cobs through the hammermill with a real course screen and I sell that for some different reasons. One customer uses the ground cob for bedding for rabbits and a nother mixes it with shelled corn to burn in her corn stove. She says it helps a whole lot in cutting down on the clinkers that the shelled corn alone produce.

 
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SAm#3
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 10:29 am    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I think he means ripened ear corn. Can be either shucked or not.
As per the comments received it's gone out of style. First came the hand picker, then the machanical picker, with and without shucker, now now high speed combines. Soon, I suppose someone will attach the mill to the combine and wala, one field operation from field to plate, er feeder.
It'a all a matter of cost vs. results.

 
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Mark
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 11:29 am    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

kyhayman,

Does the cob have any feed value at all? Now if it contains no nutrients at all, then it is just filler....(which is how I tend to view it). But when feeding ground ear corn..that cob filler tends to bulk the feed ration and keep the protein content at an acceptable level. It lets the critter get the needed protein and get 'filled up' at the same time. I can't seem to find any thing wrong with this approach. Maybe it is a Kentucky thing..I'm in Greenup Co.

 

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kyhayman
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 12:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I was going to look it up in the NRC tables but they are in the office in the garage and I've already taken my shoe and leg brace off. So I'm looking at the NRC tables from 2005 that I got in a handout from Dr. Preston at the American Society of Animal Science. I think the long answer has to do with materials handling. Shelled corn stores, hauls and augers better than ear corn. People that are serious about corn (in the midwest) made the moe more due to better automation with shelled corn than with any real feed value advantage or disadvantage with cattle. Now hogs are a different story, since most of the energy in the cob is in fiber, its not going to help a non-ruminant any except to keep them regular (and not a good thing in a confinement operation).

Feed value on a dry matter basis from Dr. Preston:
TDN crude protein crude fiber
Whole shelled corn 88 9 2
Ground corn 88 9 2
Corn and cob meal 82 8 9
Corn cobs 48 3 36

I think the primary reason it makes so little difference in food value between ground corn and ground corn and cob is the low weight of the cob. They may be bulky but they dont add enough mass to the load to significantly lower the feed value. But they do bulk the animal up, reduce intake, and help to make them feel full. I've seen some guys that tried limit feeding high energy feeds to momma cows in the winter (15# of high energy and protein feed, with 2# of long fiber per day). OMG, the cows looked great but you couldnt hold them in a field without electric since they were hungary. Even though their nutritional needs were being met,they wanted to eat. I've got the rest of that table, ADF/NDF all the other stuff, just copied the essentials. Let me know if you want more.....

 

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paul
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 11:13 pm    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

> Both local feed mills pay $1 a bushel premium over shelled corn posted price. Of course a bushel of ear corn is heavier so you that counts against you.

A bu of shell corn weights 56#.

A bu of ear corn weighs 70#.

I'm trying to grasp how the premium is paid? Let's say regular shell corn is worth $3.00 a bu.

Would they pay you $4.00 for a 70# bu of ear corn?

--->Paul

 

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paul
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 11:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I'm going to have to remember that. Could you say a good ration of ground cobs to shell corn for the stove????

--->Paul

 

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kyhayman
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 6:39 am    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

That's correct. They weigh you in and weigh you on the way out (well one does, the other you have to scale at the concrete company a half mile away). No samples, no moisture tests, no dockage. Local paper has the cash grain Central Bluegrass posted price, if its 3.45 they write you a check, by the load or by the day for 4.45 per 70 pounds.

Some of the other mills give the same premium but trade ear corn by the barrel. When I raised ear corn a wealth of people wanted to buy it that way (my understanding is 5 bushels make a barrel).

 

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MyrlfromPA
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 10:40 am    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I think the girl uses about 25% ground cob by volume but she also uses a good size handful or two to start the fire instead of the expensive starter cakes they was using. As to you lower post asking why the mill would pay a little more for the cobb corn over the shelled corn is people pay them a ridiculus price just to feed the cobb corn to the squirrel and deer. If you could bag it in them fancy camofloged bags and stock it in a sporting store it goes for a terrible high price. Just go to tractor supply and look what they get for it or china mart even. Everyone gets a lot more than the average farmer for grain crops.

 
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David in MD
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2006 2:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Is there more money in cobb corn? Reply to specific post Reply with quote

In my area ear corn is a specialty market for squirrel or deer feeding so there is money to be made but not on a large quantity. Some small dairy farmers still use ear corn as the picker and a few wagons are relatively inexpensive compared to a combine. Storage is also cheaper as 20% moisture ear corn will keep in a wooden or wire corn crib. 20% moisture shelled corn will spoil in a grain tank unless it is dried and cooled first. My biggest complaint about ear picking is the old new idea pickers didn't have stripper plates and would shell a good bit of corn off of the ear at the snapping rolls. A smart man told me the amount of corn lost in the field by an ear picker would pay to hire a custom combine and I believe him.

 
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