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STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES


 
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KNJLUTZ
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 5:43 am    Post subject: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

DOES ANYONE HAVE USED OR CAN I GET NEW STEEL SEED TUBES FOR THE GRASS SEED BOX ON A JOHN DEER GRAIN DRILL -I DO NOT WANT THE RUBBER REPLACEMENTS (FF,FB, FBA DRILLS) ANYONE GOT ANY INFO PLEASE POST OR CAN CALL ME AT 651-212-1885 THANKS
 
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Christos
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 8:03 am    Post subject: Re: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

The PN you seek is R 258 M...Parts Depot doesn"t have them so you"re going to have to go to your John Deere Dealer and ask them to see if any other dealers have them. That one dealership that advertises in Green Magazine would probably be a good choice.

You didn"t say WHICH drill you"re working on however the Part Catalogs for the FB, FB-A, FB-B and FB-C are available as a free PDF download from JDParts.com.

I have an FB and I would upgrade to the rubber tubes. You can get what Deere is selling now at TSC and cut to fit.

Christos

PS Please take the Caps Lock off.
 
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KNJLUTZ
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:16 am    Post subject: Re: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

i know that the rubber replacements are available at fleet farm tractor supply and john deere but i would like some metal ones that are original (need 6 of them) i would like to know if anyone makes new metal ones or if anyone has some used ones for sale please
 
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James22
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 7:11 pm    Post subject: Re: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I asked the same question and someone replied that they had several NOS ones and wanted to know what length I needed. But haven't been to the farm and checked. However the ones you want are going to have a smaller diameter than the ones used for normal seed. We had spiral ribbon steel tubes on our Oliver grass seed box and they were pretty small diameter compared to the standard seed tubes. Nobody appears to reproduce them, but there appears to be a market.
 
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spacechem
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 8:47 pm    Post subject: Re: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I bet you'll have to find them here & there off of junkers. There are many thousands of these machines- many of them still working- and the change was made a long time ago to the same clear tube used for planter insecticide. As the useful life of a drill tapers off, a lot of guys would stop replacing the grass seed tubes and just let it fall where it may.

I assume you want the originals for an authentic restoration. Be prepared for a long hunt and a lot of tubes before you come up with a full set more-or-less matching in patina. But hey, if it was easy, everybody'd be doin' it...
 
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KNJLUTZ
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:24 am    Post subject: Re: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I DID END UP FINDING SOME AT THE LOCAL TRACTOR SALVAGE YARD THANKS FOR THE INFO.
 
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leonardj
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2019 5:49 pm    Post subject: Re: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

I have a Minneapolis Moline drill from the 30's that had several bad seed tubes. I searched online for quite a while, but eventually realized the only way was to try to fabricate new ones. At first I thought they were spring steel, but this doesnt seem to be the case. After some trial and error I was able to wind tubes that are nearly identical to the originals:

* Carefully unwind an old tube, you will find it isn't a straight strip, but is a coiled shape, like a nautilus shell. My drill had strips 32 mm wide, 0.5mm thick, in a coil about 430mm in diameter, going around almost exactly twice (720 degrees).
* Lay out the identical shape on a new piece of galvanized steel, then cut out with aviation snips.
* Set up a 16mm rod (5/8") about 500-700mm long to be used as the winding spindle. Mounting it in a lathe, supported by the tailstock on the far end works best. Clamp the near end of rod and the starting (outer) end of the nautilus shaped strip in the chuck.
* Make sure you wear leather or kevlar gloves, as the sheetmetal edges could be sharp.
* Tightly wind the strip around the rod, with a uniform pitch of about 7.5mm (5/16"). With its nautilus shape, the strip will easily wind at this pitch. Never let go while winding, keep it very tight on the rod at all times. If you let go, it's impossible to tighten up again.
* Wind all the way to the end, and form the last bit of the end around the rod with a mallet.
* Now carefully let go. The coil will unwind, expanding to about twice the diameter and increasing its pitch.
* Remove from the spindle rod, and adjust the length or diameter by pulling or twisting gently. The steel has a natural spring, and isn't too easy to change much at this point.
* Cut the ends straight, and remount on the hopper piece with pop rivets or small screws.

Because this winding method so naturally produces a tube with a similar spring to the original, my guess is that's the way these were made. More automated, of course.
 
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Shortfarmer
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 4:04 pm    Post subject: Re: STEEL GRAIN DRILL SEED TUBES Reply to specific post Reply with quote

Hello, would you be able/willing to build about 6 of these for sale? I have a M-M 3-6 grain drill and need to replace several.
Lease let me know.
Thank you,
Shortfarmer



leonardj wrote:
(quoted from post at 18:49:53 07/03/19) I have a Minneapolis Moline drill from the 30's that had several bad seed tubes. I searched online for quite a while, but eventually realized the only way was to try to fabricate new ones. At first I thought they were spring steel, but this doesnt seem to be the case. After some trial and error I was able to wind tubes that are nearly identical to the originals:

* Carefully unwind an old tube, you will find it isn't a straight strip, but is a coiled shape, like a nautilus shell. My drill had strips 32 mm wide, 0.5mm thick, in a coil about 430mm in diameter, going around almost exactly twice (720 degrees).
* Lay out the identical shape on a new piece of galvanized steel, then cut out with aviation snips.
* Set up a 16mm rod (5/8") about 500-700mm long to be used as the winding spindle. Mounting it in a lathe, supported by the tailstock on the far end works best. Clamp the near end of rod and the starting (outer) end of the nautilus shaped strip in the chuck.
* Make sure you wear leather or kevlar gloves, as the sheetmetal edges could be sharp.
* Tightly wind the strip around the rod, with a uniform pitch of about 7.5mm (5/16"). With its nautilus shape, the strip will easily wind at this pitch. Never let go while winding, keep it very tight on the rod at all times. If you let go, it's impossible to tighten up again.
* Wind all the way to the end, and form the last bit of the end around the rod with a mallet.
* Now carefully let go. The coil will unwind, expanding to about twice the diameter and increasing its pitch.
* Remove from the spindle rod, and adjust the length or diameter by pulling or twisting gently. The steel has a natural spring, and isn't too easy to change much at this point.
* Cut the ends straight, and remount on the hopper piece with pop rivets or small screws.

Because this winding method so naturally produces a tube with a similar spring to the original, my guess is that's the way these were made. More automated, of course.

 
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