Add hydraulic remote for quik attach on MF 20C

jacks

Member
I have a 1980 MF 20C industrial tractor with 32A loader. I have converted the loader arms to quik attach to accept skid steer attachments. I would like to add a remote valve to serve hydraulic drive attachments such as a concrete mixer or sickle mower. There are two separate hydraulic systems, one for the 3 point hitch and also an engine coupled pump for the loader providing 19 GPM. I would like to tap into the loader hydraulic system. Has anyone done this on an industrial tractor and have any suggestions?
 
I have a 1980 MF 20C industrial tractor with 32A loader. I have converted the loader arms to quik attach to accept skid steer attachments. I would like to add a remote valve to serve hydraulic drive attachments such as a concrete mixer or sickle mower. There are two separate hydraulic systems, one for the 3 point hitch and also an engine coupled pump for the loader providing 19 GPM. I would like to tap into the loader hydraulic system. Has anyone done this on an industrial tractor and have any suggestions?
I believe your loader hydraulic system is open center. You can't just "tap into it". You would need a power beyond adapter in your existing control valve to feed the new valve. Or you can add a diverter valve, which would need to be shifted to port oil from one control valve to the other, each time you wanted swapped the valve you wanted to use. A third option, and the cleanest, is to get a new loader control valve with a third function spool already in it. A fourth is there are hydraulic multiplier set ups that let you flip a switch and use your same valve spool (most usually tie into the bucket spool) to operate the bucket and the attachment. This adds an electrical control system for the multiplier, more hoses, and many cost more in the end than getting a new 3 spool loader valve.
 
I believe your loader hydraulic system is open center. You can't just "tap into it". You would need a power beyond adapter in your existing control valve to feed the new valve. Or you can add a diverter valve, which would need to be shifted to port oil from one control valve to the other, each time you wanted swapped the valve you wanted to use. A third option, and the cleanest, is to get a new loader control valve with a third function spool already in it. A fourth is there are hydraulic multiplier set ups that let you flip a switch and use your same valve spool (most usually tie into the bucket spool) to operate the bucket and the attachment. This adds an electrical control system for the multiplier, more hoses, and many cost more in the end than getting a new 3 spool loader valve.
Wouldn't plumbing a single spool valve in series with the existing valve function the same as a 3 spool valve?
 
Wouldn't plumbing a single spool valve in series with the existing valve function the same as a 3 spool valve?
Yes, it would work, in series. He posted about this on Tractor and Farm Talk also, there he wanted to know if he could just tee into the pressure and return lines (valves in parallel which would not work).

When plumbed in series the first valve in line from the pump would need to have the system relief valve. A relief in the second valve would not be needed.
 
Yes, it would work, in series. He posted about this on Tractor and Farm Talk also, there he wanted to know if he could just tee into the pressure and return lines (valves in parallel which would not work).

When plumbed in series the first valve in line from the pump would need to have the system relief valve. A relief in the second valve would not be needed.
Jim, I'm not sure this would work. I believe he would have to close the center on the one of the valves to use the other valve and vice versa. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I don't have much experience in hydraulic systems.

I tried this on my 202 and it didn't work. The open center on the loader spool stole the pressure from the T plumbed in series. I ended up using a 3way for my log splitter.

If I wanted to add a grapple or 4 way bucket, I would use a 3 spool valve. For a concrete mixer or log splitter I would use a 3 way valve.
 

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Jim, I'm not sure this would work. I believe he would have to close the center on the one of the valves to use the other valve and vice versa. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I don't have much experience in hydraulic systems.

I tried this on my 202 and it didn't work. The open center on the loader spool stole the pressure from the T plumbed in series. I ended up using a 3way for my log splitter.

If I wanted to add a grapple or 4 way bucket, I would use a 3 spool valve. For a concrete mixer or log splitter I would use a 3 way valve.
It would not work if teed in, the valves would need to be in series (pump pressure to inlet of the first valve, outlet/return port of the first valve would be plumbed to the inlet of the second valve (not the reservoir), then outlet of the second valve would hook to the return line that was originally hooked to the first valve to return oil to the reservoir. The first valve in line would need a system relief valve the second valve would not as the relief in the first valve would cover both valves plumbed this way, but it would not hurt to have a relief in the second valve as well (both should be at the same pressure setting.
 
Jim, I'm not sure this would work. I believe he would have to close the center on the one of the valves to use the other valve and vice versa. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I don't have much experience in hydraulic systems.

I tried this on my 202 and it didn't work. The open center on the loader spool stole the pressure from the T plumbed in series. I ended up using a 3way for my log splitter.

If I wanted to add a grapple or 4 way bucket, I would use a 3 spool valve. For a concrete mixer or log splitter I would use a 3 way valve.
Putting a T in an open center system will not work. Hydraulic pressure is like water and electricity. It follows the path of least resistance. Teeing the valve in creates a parallel circuit and gives the oil a choice of which way to go. On the other hand, if the valves are plumbed in series, meaning the return port of the first valve is connected to the inlet port of the second valve and the return port of the second valve goes back to the reservoir, the oil has to go through both valves.
 
It would not work if teed in, the valves would need to be in series (pump pressure to inlet of the first valve, outlet/return port of the first valve would be plumbed to the inlet of the second valve (not the reservoir), then outlet of the second valve would hook to the return line that was originally hooked to the first valve to return oil to the reservoir. The first valve in line would need a system relief valve the second valve would not as the relief in the first valve would cover both valves plumbed this way, but it would not hurt to have a relief in the second valve as well (both should be at the same pressure setting.
Jim, thanks for explaining that. Would the first valve need to have the power beyond port installed? Or, is the power beyond so you can keep the return for the first valve at the first valve?
 
Jim, thanks for explaining that. Would the first valve need to have the power beyond port installed? Or, is the power beyond so you can keep the return for the first valve at the first valve?
The power beyond adapter allows the original return to remain on the original valve and the second valve's return can be teed into the first valve's return line. Pump pressure from the first valve is ported to the second valves inlet through the power beyond adapter. Not all valves are set up to have power beyond, or the required sleeve/adapter may be NLA.
 
The power beyond adapter allows the original return to remain on the original valve and the second valve's return can be teed into the first valve's return line. Pump pressure from the first valve is ported to the second valves inlet through the power beyond adapter. Not all valves are set up to have power beyond, or the required sleeve/adapter may be NLA.
Jim, thanks for the explanation. It has cleared a lot up for me. Thanks again.
 

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